Posts Tagged ‘williams arizona’

Hike to the Top of Humphreys Peak

July 25th, 2014 by Del & Sheryl Terry

                                                   Humphreys Peak outside Williams Arizona near the Grand Canyon Bed and Breakfast

East of the  town of Williams is the highest point in Arizona.

Humphreys Peak is the tallest peak in the San Francisco Peaks (upper left), but is often hidden from view on I-17 behind the second tallest mountain in the State, Agassiz Peak (12,360 ft).  From the top, you can see all the way to Grand Canyon (a little more than 70 mile

The nine-mile-round-trip hike officially begins around 9,500 feet in elevation at Arizona Snowbowl.  The main trailhead is located on a parking lot to the left of Snowbowl Road as it passes into the developed ski area.  However, hikers can save about a mile of walking by driving up to the upper lodge of Snowbowl for the second of two trailheads.  A spur trail from this lodge connects with the Humphreys Trail, though some locals consider this the unofficial route of ascent.

From there, the trail winds thru a dense alpine forest and steadily ascends to a ridgeline.  From here, the trail heads to a saddle located between Humphreys and Agassiz Peaks.  Due to threat of a rare plant species, ascending to the top of Agassiz is not permitted.

The Humphreys Trail continues as a cinder path, a little more than a mile from the saddle to the peak. Expect high winds and sprawling and spectacular views in all directions.Humphreys trail at Humphreys Peak in Williams Arizona close to Grand Canyon Bed and Breakfast.

The San Francisco Peaks are the remains of an eroded stratovolcano which erupted around 200,000 years ago (before eruption, 16,000 ft).

A stratovolcano is a tall, conical volcano composed of one layer of hardened lava, tephra, and volcanic ash.  Plan on spending the day between nights at Grand Canyon Bed and Breakfast and spend a day on Humphreys Peak.

Grand Canyon Caverns

July 21st, 2014 by Del & Sheryl Terry

Grand Canyon Caverns located on the Coconino Plateau,

the Caverns lie within an alluvial plain at an altitude of about 5,300 feet (1,600 m) above sea level. Limestone comprises the vast majority of the subsurface area of this vicinity of the Coconino Plateau, an area riddled with numerous cavernous veins that run for miles in all directions.Grand Canyon Taverns off Rte 66; http://www.gokingman.com/media/uploads/images/Grand-Canyon-Caverns-300px-.jpg

Just 66 miles West of Williams ,AZ on Route 66, the Caverns lie 230 feet (70 m) below ground level. They are among the largest of dry caverns in the United States. Dry caverns are a rarity in that as little as 3% of caverns in the world are dry. Because of this fact, stalagmites and stalactites are very few in numbers. The caverns are enormous, with measurements showing that the length of 3 football fields could fit snugly within its boundaries.

345 million years ago, during the Mississippian Period, the southwest United States was enveloped by the ocean. Sea creatures died over the millions of years, their skeletons created a mud-like paste with a dense amount of lime. This eventually hardened into the limestone bedrock, which can be seen in the caverns today. As millions of years came and went, the bedrock was pushed up, to over 5,000 feet (1,500 m) above sea level. These methodical events split the crust of the Earth, releasing water into what is now the caverns.Grand Canyon Caverns off Rte 66; http://t2.gstatic.com/images?q=tbn:ANd9GcTAL3tZ_H5Rdf1vmTBPXH6FukaB8j-RqUEhB3YAXtqHxuo4VN8i

Approximately 35 million years ago, huge amounts of rainfall carrying a mildly acidic element flowed into the caverns. This solution eventually crept its way through the cracks and caves ultimately contributing to the Colorado River. Millions of years later the evaporating water leaving calcium deposits began decorating the walls and floors, creating wondrous and beautiful formations that can still be viewed by the public today.

Contemporary History

In 1927, Walter Peck, a cowboy and woodcutter, was walking through the area on his way to play poker with his friends. when he stumbled and nearly fell into a sizable hole in the ground. The following morning, Peck, and some of his friends returned to the location of the large, funnel shaped hole with lanterns and ropes. Peck was lowered into the hole by his friends with a rope tied around his waist to a depth of 150 feet (46 m) with a lantern and began exploring.

A very large, dark cavern welcomed Peck during his initial exploration where he saw some speckles on the walls that he thought were gold. He gathered up samples of some of these shiny rocks and had his friends pull him back to the surface. Peck then purchased the property and began making preparations for a gold mining operation. Once the assay reports were completed he learned that his potential mother lode was nothing more than iron oxide.Grand Canyon Caverns off Rte 66; http://t3.gstatic.com/images?q=tbn:ANd9GcRhGLetIT1O3rTpq_DQTRL3YwJvkCnZtdYG7nGAlXXm2PBhfp8-nQ

Not one to give up on entrepreneurial opportunities, Peck came up with an idea to lure travelers to the Caverns and began charging 25 cents to lower these early spelunkers down into the Caverns to explore and to view what had been reported in newspapers to be the remains of a caveman that had earlier been located on a ledge. Although the ‘caveman’ had also lured scientist from the east to study the remains, it was later confirmed in the 1960s to be the remains of two inhabitants of the area. These inhabitants had been in the area barely a decade earlier during the winter of 1917-1918, when a group of Indians were harvesting and cutting firewood on the caverns hilltop and a snow storm trapped them for three days. Two brothers died from a flu epidemic and since the ground was frozen solid with deep snow cover, their fellow lumberjacks buried them in what they thought was only a 50-foot (15 m) hole because returning them to their tribal headquarters in Peach Springs, risked spreading the flu.

An entrance was built into the Caverns by blasting a 210-foot (64 m) shaft in the limestone and installing a large elevator at which time the natural entrance was also sealed off at the request of the Hualapai as it was considered a sacred burial place. Near the natural entrance, the skeletal remains of a giant and extinct ground sloth were found; it lived during the Age of Mammals when the Woolly Mammoth and Saber Tooth Cat lived more than 11,000 years ago. The study of the remains indicate it stood over 15 feet (4.6 m) tall and weighed near 2,000 pounds.Grand Canyon Caverns off Rte 66; http://www.utchs.com/Grand_Canyon_Caverns/IMG_0342.jpg

In 1962, the Caverns were renamed, Grand Canyon Caverns, with good reason, as it is connected to the Grand Canyon to the north.  They are an  Historic Route 66 roadside tourist attraction that has survived into the current century with nearly 100,000 tourists annually.

Features

Grand Canyon Caverns is the largest dry caverns in the United States and maybe the largest dry cavern system on earth as they are still being explored and documented by both amateur and professional spelunkers, archaeologists, geologists and other varieties of scientists. At a constant 57 degrees with only a 2 percent humidity year round the Caverns are an ideal preservatory.  Air comes into the caverns from the Grand Canyon through 60 miles (97 km) of limestone caves. (See picture of opening at end of article). Scientists were curious as to how far the caverns extended and looked for a safe means of finding out. Rather than explore the canyons, which could take years, red smoke flares were ignited by University of Arizona students, and two weeks later red smoke was seen protruding from vents, near Supai, AZ, in the Grand Canyon, thus the name.  Supai Falls near Grand Canyon Caverns; http://photos2.demandstudios.com/dm-resize/photos.demandstudios.com%2Fgetty%2Farticle%2F88%2F114%2F87672387_XS.jpg?w=400&h=10000&keep_ratio=1

Spelunkers and tourists alike can take a 45-minute, guided, walking tour of the Caverns beginning with a 21-story, or 210-foot (64 m) descent from the earth’s surface in a large elevator, or a shorter 25-minute wheelchair accessible tour. The more hardcore and professional spelunkers can explore on their own, with the proper permission of course, areas that are never seen by the ordinary tours.

The first cavern that one enters after their descent by elevator is the Chapel of the Ages cavern room which is so large it could hold up to two football fields. There have been numerous weddings performed in this room throughout the years. The most popular guided walking tour is about 3/4 of a mile long through winding, natural tunnels where guests will see helecite crystals, a rather rare form of selenite, red-wall limestone, ‘teacup handles’, ‘winter crystals’ and more.  The Caverns are a popular natural feature of this vast recreational area in Northern Arizona.

2014 Corvette Show

June 18th, 2014 by Del & Sheryl Terry

National Corvette Caravan: August 28-30, 2014

2014 is here!  Do you enjoy a great road trip and gathering of Corvette enthusiasts? If so join us for the 2014 Caravan to the National Corvette Museum for the 20th Anniversary of the National Corvette Museum in beautiful Bowling Green, Kentucky. This event is scheduled once every five years and is the Event of the Year for Corvette owners!

Maybe you are new to the Corvette world, or maybe you do not know of the 2014 Caravan, so what is the 2014 Caravan? It is a gathering of Corvette enthusiasts from around the United States, Canada and several other countries. We form caravans of Corvettes from locations around the Country to make a great road trip to Bowling Green, Kentucky. This will be an event beginning in late August which will celebrate the 20th Anniversary of the National Corvette Museum on Labor Day weekend of 2014. Caravans will form from locations close to your home for this event so you can participate with thousands of other Corvette owners. Participants can join at various locations along the way.  We will caravan along scenic sections of old Route 66. What could be better than travelling along the Mother Road in your Corvette?

On Route 66 we will join with the Southern California, Southern Nevada and Southwestern Utah Caravan at Williams, AZ., Friday – August 22: we will join the S. Cal/ S. Nevada/ SW Utah Caravan.  A Meet & Greet and a Show and Shine car show are planned along Route 66 in the last town to be bypassed on the ‘Mother Road’.

Come and stay with us at Grand Canyon Bed and Breakfast for this event.  You won’t get another chance for five years.

Caravan through Williams Arizona to Kentucky for the 20th Anniversary of the Corvette Museum

 

Red Rock Arches of Northern Arizona

June 2nd, 2014 by Del & Sheryl Terry

Adventures With Red Rock Arches -

You don’t have to travel to Arches National Park; experience Arizona’s Red Rock Arches within a 1.5 hour drive from Grand Canyon Bed and Breakfast.Arizona's Red Rock Arches in northern arizona near the Grand Canyon Bed and Breakfast

 

Most people come to Fay Canyon to see the natural arch that’s located just under a mile up the trail. But those who don’t know about it usually walk right past it. Though the Fay Canyon Arch is by no means small, it looks so much like an ordinary rock overhang it’s easy to glance right at it and not realize what you’ve seen. If you keep watching the rock wall to the north (right) side of the trail sooner or later you’ll spot it. Then the short, steep trail up to the arch can be a little hard to locate too.

After you’ve found the arch you may want to continue on up the trail. This small, hidden canyon supports a diverse community of desert plants and provides good views of the surrounding cliffs. The trail follows an old jeep track which eventually turns into a footpath. It dead ends at a red Supai sandstone cliff where you can see evidence of some ancient Indian dwellings and marvel at the breathtaking scenery that surrounds you.

   Area/Length : Red Supai sandstone cliff of northern Arizona near the Grand Canyon Bed and Breakfast

  1.1 miles

  Latitude :

34.901929

  Longitude :

-111.85791

  Elevation :

4592 at trailhead

 

Devil’s Bridge is the largest natural sandstone arch in the Sedona area; don’t let its name fool you: It’s one of the most heavenly sights in an area famous for them.

From a trailhead elevation of 4,600 feet, there’s a mere 400 foot climb in altitude during this moderately difficult, 1.8-mile roundtrip trek; the journey to reach the top won’t leave you breathless — but we would never say the same about the views you’ll witness when you finally get there.

This popular hike has attractions for both casual hikers who lack the desire or the stamina to stray too far from civilization, and the more adventurous outdoors enthusiasts. Starting at the parking area, follow the trailmarker that points the way to Devil’s Bridge Trail. You’ll find the early going effortless; the trail, originally built for jeep travel, is smooth and clear and leads you through washes filled with juniper and prickly pear cactus.

Area/Length :

  0.8 miles

  Latitude :

34.903223

  Longitude :

-111.81396

  Elevation :

4607 at trailhead

 

Take an easy hike along the bottom of Sterling Canyon. The drainage is dry most of the year. Shade is available, but it would be wise to carry some water in the warm months.Sterling Canyon in northern Arizona near the Grand Canyon Bed and Breakfast

The signed trailhead is on the east side of the parking area. The well maintained trail almost immediately enters Wilderness and climbs gradually in the shade of Arizona cypress beside a dry stream bed on the floor of Sterling Canyon. There are occasional views of red rock formations to the left and of the sheer walls of Lost Wilson Mountain on the right. After .75 miles, the trail enters stands of ponderosa pine and oak which show the scars from the 1996 “Arch” fire.  Nearing the 1.75 mile point, there is a marked fork. Sterling Pass Trail branches off to the right. Keep left and continue 100 yards where the trail ends at a large red rock outcrop. There are nice views of the canyon, mountains and of Vultee Arch, about .25 miles the north.

  Area/Length :

  1.75 miles

  Latitude :

34.937106

  Longitude :

-111.794187

  Elevation :

4803 at trailhead

De Berge Saddlery & Western Outfitters

April 28th, 2014 by Del & Sheryl Terry

On your way down Route 40

 or towards the Grand Canyon, you have to slooooow down (15 mph) and go to De Berge’s Saddlery and Western Outfitters on Rte 66 in downtown Williams, AZ.  Martha’s husband (from the East coast) loved the belts and couldn’t make up his mind about the designs… she quietly ordered  one of the designs as a Christmas gift and within a short time the belt was in her hands!  Beautiful hats and belts as well as other products. You’ll see it’s worth the stop in the “slow movin’” town of Williams to visit and shop the workshop/store.

Belt making at the De Berge Saddlery and Western Outfitters in Williams Arizona close to the Grand Canyon Bed and Breakfast

If you are into real western wear and not the drugstore cowboy variety, this is the place to go. Anything leather, from saddles to gun holsters to belts and boots, are made here to order. The leather smith is Tamara, a charming young lady with a gifted hand for shaping and tooling leather. She makes her own designs and custom fits; generally a 90 day lead time. Tamara has a clientele made up mostly of locals cowboys & Europeans, but while Alfred , (from the West coast), was there a Navajo man came in to have a gun belt made for himself. Can’t get more real than that. Thick solid leather tends to have a macho look to it, but in Tamara’s hands embossed with floral designs it also becomes extremely elegant for the ladies. While much of her work is custom, there are enough ready-made things in the shop to make it worthwhile to stop in Williams at the De Berge Saddlery for instant gratification of your leather and western wear urges as you transit the state or move toward the Grand Canyon.

Northern Arizona Christmas Mountain Village Holiday

November 22nd, 2013 by Del & Sheryl Terry

A Northern Arizona Christmas Mountain Village Holiday.

Saturday, November 30 kicks off the 2013 Christmas season in the great little mountain town sultana theater; mountain village holiday

of Williams, AZ. It starts with the 10th Annual Mountain Village Holiday Craft Show at the World Famous Sultana Theatre. The craft show is available from 10:00 am to 5:00 pm. The theatre is located @ 301 W Rte 66. There will be over 35 vendors with a wonderful variety of those special gifts you seek for the Holiday Season and other occasions as well. Angel, with Simply Angelic Photography will be there to take pictures of your children or the whole family. She will have 4×6 and 5×7 prints available to take with you right away.

 

This is a fundraiser for the SAVE-MTR (Meant To Rescue) Animal Facility in Williams. All proceeds from the vendors’ rent and your donations go to the animals. Buy your special gifts, have your picture taken and help SAVE-MTR at the same time. Have dinner at one of the fine restaurants is town and then, starting @ 6:30 pm, join the community for the Mountain Village Holiday, Parade of Lights and Official Tree Lighting Ceremony event. This annual colorful light parade is a holiday favorite as it proceeds down historic Route 66. Enjoy the official Tree Lighting Ceremony immediately following the parade.

 

El Tovar guest room; mountain village holiday

 

The Williams-Grand Canyon Chamber of Commerce adorns the city with lights, wreaths and ornaments. ”Christmas lights, there’s just something very nostalgic about them,” she said. “I think a lot of people respond to that nostalgia of Christmas and the holidays and the lights.”The chamber is also putting on a residential and commercial lighting contest. This year’s theme is “All I want for Christmas is…”

Spend November 29th and 30th in one of the guest rooms or family suites at Grand Canyon Bed and Breakfast as you start your Christmas season in Williams, AZ.

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