Posts Tagged ‘northern arizona vacations’

Desert View Watchtower

August 22nd, 2014 by Del & Sheryl Terry

Desert View Watchtower is one of the most prominent architectural features on the South Rim of Grand Canyon National Park

Desert View Watchtower in the Grand Canyon close to the Bed and Breakfast in WilliamsDesert View Watchtower in the Grand Canyon close to the Bed and Breakfast in Williams  The tower is located at the Easternmost view point once you enter the Park on Hwy 64 coming from the Navajo community of Cameron on Hwy 89.

The watchtower was designed by the renowned early 20th century architect Mary Elizabeth Jane Colter in collaboration with some of the renowned Hopi artisans of the day.  Murals by well-known Hope artist Fred Kabotie are featured prominently on the second level of the circular stairwell.

View of Painted Desert from Desert View Watchtower; http://worldonabike.com/files/2009/04/20090228img-2755grand-canyon-1.jpg  From the top floor of the tower, you see the varied colors of the Painted Desert and the Navajo Nation (the largest Native American reservation in the US) to the East, and the confluence of the Little Colorado River and the Colorado River to the North.  To the West you see the majesty of the 13 mile wide Grand Canyon.

Native American of Northern Arizona

August 5th, 2014 by Del & Sheryl Terry

The Hopi, Navajo, and Havasupai Native American cultures have the closet ties to Grand Canyon.  All three have their creation ‘stories’  originating here.

You can experience the home of these three peoples today as you visit the Indian Nations around Grand Canyon Bed and Breakfast.

For more than 40,000 visitors a year, the famed Havasu Falls on the Havasupai Reservation is where it’s at when it comes to Grand Canyon.  Located in a side canyon that opens onto the Colorado river, Havasu Creek (which originates as Cataract Creek in Williams, AZ)  drops along four major falls, the most popular and scenic being Havasu Falls.  A campground located just downstream from the falls offers the perfect oasis getaway.  Because a hike or backpack trip, is eight miles one way, and the hike farther down canyon can lead to several more miles of exploration, it is a high adventure experience.

Native American History Havasu Falls near the Grand Canyon Bed and Breakfast; http://www.wildbackpacker.com/wp-content/uploads/havasufallsfromtrail.jpg

Covering 27,000 square miles (70,000 square kilometers), the Navajo Nation is the single largest Native American reservation in the United States.  Because this area consists of vast stretches of open land a car is necessary to get around. Be sure to fill up your gas tank when you have the opportunity. Service stations are few and far between in this region.  The characteristic folk art of the Navajo is the Navajo rug (or blanket). Each region of the reservation has its own characteristic style of weavings, with a few patterns that can be found reservation-wide. As with other folk art, quality and prices vary wildly; small items for the tourist trade can be had for as little as $20 or so, while a gigantic, museum-quality (but brand-new rather than antique) rug from the prestigious “Two Grey Hills” region sold for $60,000 at an Indian market a few years ago. The key thing to remember is that the value of a particular weaving is the value you place on it. If you see a piece you like, haggle over price if you wish; if you don’t get the price you want, look for another one. Also, look for Navajo turquoise/silver jewelry. The closest location to our B&B to experience Navajo culture, art and food is at Cameron Trading Post on the ‘Rez’

. Native American Cameron Trading Post near Grand Canyon Bed and Breakfast; http://www.toadlenatradingpost.com/images/home/generations_350x200.jpg

To experience first-hand one of the most studied and revered Native American cultures in the country, visit the Hopi Nation. The Hopi Tribe is a sovereign nation located in northeastern Arizona. The reservation occupies part of Coconino and Navajo counties, encompasses more than 1.5 million acres, and is made up of 12 villages on three mesas.  Hopi art is characterized by their pottery and hand carve kachina.

Since time immemorial the Hopi people have lived in Hopituskwa and have maintained there sacred covenant with Maasaw, the ancient caretaker of the earth, to live as peaceful and humble farmers respectful of the land and its resources. Over the centuries they have survived as a tribe, and to this day have managed to retain there culture, language and religion despite influences from the outside world.

Native American Culture Kachina Dolls; http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/8/81/Kachina_dolls.jpg

Elden Pueblo at Coconino National Forest

May 26th, 2014 by Del & Sheryl Terry

Elden Pueblo at Coconino National Forest near Grand Canyon Bed and Breakfast

Elden Pueblo is the site of an ancient Sinagua (Sin ah’ wa) village,

inhabited from about A.D. 1070 to 1275. The site is unique for a variety of reasons. Most importantly, it makes archaeology and the study of ancient peoples accessible to the public. Since 1978, professional archaeologists have supervised members of the public in excavations, archaeological research techniques and artifact analysis through a variety of public and school programs.

Conveniently located on U.S. Highway 89 north, Elden Pueblo is thought to have been part of a major trading system. This is evidenced by discoveries of trade items, such as macaw skeletons from as far south as Mexico, to shell jewelry from the California Coast. Important discoveries recently uncovered at Elden Pueblo suggest that the Sunset Crater volcano may have erupted over a much longer period of time than previously thought.

The Arizona Natural History Association sponsors the Elden Pueblo Archaeology Project with the Coconino National Forest to provide opportunities for people to learn about and become involved in the science of archaeology. Annual programs include several Public Archaeology Days, in which the public can participate in site tours, actual excavation, artifact washing and analysis, and try their hand at using ancient hunting weapons. The August Public Day features a Primitive Technology Expo and the last Public Day of the year takes place in the fall as part of the annual Flagstaff Festival of Science.

Elden Pueblo is available for school programs and groups of up to thirty people. Educational programs are correlated to the Arizona State Standards, grades 4-7 in Social Science and Science. Custom programs are available, from 1-2 hours tours, to day-long excavations, or multiple-day programs. Elden Pueblo hosts the Arizona Archaeology Society’s summer field school, where avocational archaeologists receive training in various archaeological skills, such as excavation, stabilization, mapping, and laboratory techniques. There are also summer archaeology camps for students, from third grade and up.Archaeology camps at Elden Pueblo in Coconino National Forest near Grand Canyon Bed and Breakfast

Season: The site is open year-‘round for visitation. Brochures for self-guided tours are available on-site. Public programs, school programs, field schools and camps are conducted from Mid-April through October by appointment. Contact the Elden Pueblo Program Manager at (928) 527-3452 to schedule a program.

Facilities: Parking lot. Chemical toilets during the summer field season. An undeveloped camping area with potable water is available for special program participants during the summer.

Dating to the period between AD 1100 -1275 (about 800 years ago), Elden Pueblo is a 60-70 room Sinagua pueblo containing mounds, smaller pueblos, pit houses, and other features. It is located one half mile west of Mt. Elden in Flagstaff, AZ. The modern day Hopi consider the site a special ancestral place called PASIOVI or PAVASIOKI.

Elden Pueblo was first studied in 1926 by archaeologist Jesse Walter Fewkes. Later, the US Forest Service began to study the site and in the process developed a public archaeology education program focused on the following three topics: 1) teaching the public about the lives of the Sinagua people at Elden, 2) field methods in archaeology, and 3) to facilitate on-going research and protection at Elden Pueblo.

Antelope Slot Canyons

May 13th, 2014 by Del & Sheryl Terry

The Antelope Slot Canyons have been the area’s best kept secrets for generations.  

A photographers dream, as beautiful as some of them are, don’t do Upper and Lower Antelope Canyons justice.  On entering either one, visitors often gasp in wonder.  It’s a must see day trip for photographers of all levels, and greatly recommended for everybody else.

 Upper Antelope Slot Canyon Coconino National Forest Grand Canyon Bed and Breakfast VacationsUpper Antelope Slot Canyon Coconino National Forest Grand Canyon Bed and Breakfast VacationsLower Antelope Slot Canyon Coconino National Forest Grand Canyon Bed and Breakfast VacationsLower Antelope Slot Canyon Coconino National Forest Grand Canyon Bed and Breakfast Vacations

Upper Antelope Slot Canyon                                                          Lower Antelope Slot Canyon

When you take a guided van/boat tour arranged by Grand Canyon Bed and Breakfast, you travel through the beautiful painted desert of Northeastern Arizona arriving at Lake Powell and Antelope Point Marina.  Once arriving, your boat captain will take you deep into the depths of Antelope Canyon  Antelope Slot Canyon Coconino National Forest Grand Canyon Bed and Breakfast Vacations through towering red sandstone walls close enough to touch from either side of the vessel.  During the Summer months you will visit Antelope Island to enjoy your private beach where swimming is allowed.  After your boat trip you will have a deli style lunch before continuing into Upper Antelope Canyon by land.  This is the part of the tour that has become famous with rays of light beaming through the naturally caved out sandstone canyon.  You’ll return to the B&B on your van.

 

Should you decide to drive yourself for a day at Antelope Canyons, you can visit either or both Upper and Lower.  Both Canyons are on Navajo Tribal Land and require a Native guide to take you into them.  You pay for your guide and admission at a booth before you are taken into either of them.

Upper Antelope in entered through a jagged  opening in the wall of a box canyon (see picture on the left in the collage above).  This canyon is the most often photographed of the two because it is the easiest one to carry a camera and tripod into.  The floor of the canyon is fairly level and has a soft sandy base.  When you get to the South end of the canyon, you turn around and walk back out the same opening that you entered.

Lower Antelope is beautiful in a ‘different’ way and requires a little more strenuous level of activity.  You enter thru a ‘slit’ in the sandstone and climb down many sets of ladders (the first of them is depicted in the picture on the right of the collage above) and over sandstone floors as you descend into the earth.

Lower Antelope Slot Canyon Coconino National Forest Grand Canyon Bed and Breakfast VacationsLower Antelope Slot Canyon Coconino National Forest Grand Canyon Bed and Breakfast Vacations

It takes a little more time to visit this canyon.  When you get to the end of this guided tour, you ascend on metal stairs and the see top of the canyon zigzagging across the sandstone on your right.

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