Posts Tagged ‘native american ruins’

Desert View Watchtower

August 22nd, 2014 by Del & Sheryl Terry

Desert View Watchtower is one of the most prominent architectural features on the South Rim of Grand Canyon National Park

Desert View Watchtower in the Grand Canyon close to the Bed and Breakfast in WilliamsDesert View Watchtower in the Grand Canyon close to the Bed and Breakfast in Williams  The tower is located at the Easternmost view point once you enter the Park on Hwy 64 coming from the Navajo community of Cameron on Hwy 89.

The watchtower was designed by the renowned early 20th century architect Mary Elizabeth Jane Colter in collaboration with some of the renowned Hopi artisans of the day.  Murals by well-known Hope artist Fred Kabotie are featured prominently on the second level of the circular stairwell.

View of Painted Desert from Desert View Watchtower; http://worldonabike.com/files/2009/04/20090228img-2755grand-canyon-1.jpg  From the top floor of the tower, you see the varied colors of the Painted Desert and the Navajo Nation (the largest Native American reservation in the US) to the East, and the confluence of the Little Colorado River and the Colorado River to the North.  To the West you see the majesty of the 13 mile wide Grand Canyon.

Native American of Northern Arizona

August 5th, 2014 by Del & Sheryl Terry

The Hopi, Navajo, and Havasupai Native American cultures have the closet ties to Grand Canyon.  All three have their creation ‘stories’  originating here.

You can experience the home of these three peoples today as you visit the Indian Nations around Grand Canyon Bed and Breakfast.

For more than 40,000 visitors a year, the famed Havasu Falls on the Havasupai Reservation is where it’s at when it comes to Grand Canyon.  Located in a side canyon that opens onto the Colorado river, Havasu Creek (which originates as Cataract Creek in Williams, AZ)  drops along four major falls, the most popular and scenic being Havasu Falls.  A campground located just downstream from the falls offers the perfect oasis getaway.  Because a hike or backpack trip, is eight miles one way, and the hike farther down canyon can lead to several more miles of exploration, it is a high adventure experience.

Native American History Havasu Falls near the Grand Canyon Bed and Breakfast; http://www.wildbackpacker.com/wp-content/uploads/havasufallsfromtrail.jpg

Covering 27,000 square miles (70,000 square kilometers), the Navajo Nation is the single largest Native American reservation in the United States.  Because this area consists of vast stretches of open land a car is necessary to get around. Be sure to fill up your gas tank when you have the opportunity. Service stations are few and far between in this region.  The characteristic folk art of the Navajo is the Navajo rug (or blanket). Each region of the reservation has its own characteristic style of weavings, with a few patterns that can be found reservation-wide. As with other folk art, quality and prices vary wildly; small items for the tourist trade can be had for as little as $20 or so, while a gigantic, museum-quality (but brand-new rather than antique) rug from the prestigious “Two Grey Hills” region sold for $60,000 at an Indian market a few years ago. The key thing to remember is that the value of a particular weaving is the value you place on it. If you see a piece you like, haggle over price if you wish; if you don’t get the price you want, look for another one. Also, look for Navajo turquoise/silver jewelry. The closest location to our B&B to experience Navajo culture, art and food is at Cameron Trading Post on the ‘Rez’

. Native American Cameron Trading Post near Grand Canyon Bed and Breakfast; http://www.toadlenatradingpost.com/images/home/generations_350x200.jpg

To experience first-hand one of the most studied and revered Native American cultures in the country, visit the Hopi Nation. The Hopi Tribe is a sovereign nation located in northeastern Arizona. The reservation occupies part of Coconino and Navajo counties, encompasses more than 1.5 million acres, and is made up of 12 villages on three mesas.  Hopi art is characterized by their pottery and hand carve kachina.

Since time immemorial the Hopi people have lived in Hopituskwa and have maintained there sacred covenant with Maasaw, the ancient caretaker of the earth, to live as peaceful and humble farmers respectful of the land and its resources. Over the centuries they have survived as a tribe, and to this day have managed to retain there culture, language and religion despite influences from the outside world.

Native American Culture Kachina Dolls; http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/8/81/Kachina_dolls.jpg

Red Rock Arches of Northern Arizona

June 2nd, 2014 by Del & Sheryl Terry

Adventures With Red Rock Arches -

You don’t have to travel to Arches National Park; experience Arizona’s Red Rock Arches within a 1.5 hour drive from Grand Canyon Bed and Breakfast.Arizona's Red Rock Arches in northern arizona near the Grand Canyon Bed and Breakfast

 

Most people come to Fay Canyon to see the natural arch that’s located just under a mile up the trail. But those who don’t know about it usually walk right past it. Though the Fay Canyon Arch is by no means small, it looks so much like an ordinary rock overhang it’s easy to glance right at it and not realize what you’ve seen. If you keep watching the rock wall to the north (right) side of the trail sooner or later you’ll spot it. Then the short, steep trail up to the arch can be a little hard to locate too.

After you’ve found the arch you may want to continue on up the trail. This small, hidden canyon supports a diverse community of desert plants and provides good views of the surrounding cliffs. The trail follows an old jeep track which eventually turns into a footpath. It dead ends at a red Supai sandstone cliff where you can see evidence of some ancient Indian dwellings and marvel at the breathtaking scenery that surrounds you.

   Area/Length : Red Supai sandstone cliff of northern Arizona near the Grand Canyon Bed and Breakfast

  1.1 miles

  Latitude :

34.901929

  Longitude :

-111.85791

  Elevation :

4592 at trailhead

 

Devil’s Bridge is the largest natural sandstone arch in the Sedona area; don’t let its name fool you: It’s one of the most heavenly sights in an area famous for them.

From a trailhead elevation of 4,600 feet, there’s a mere 400 foot climb in altitude during this moderately difficult, 1.8-mile roundtrip trek; the journey to reach the top won’t leave you breathless — but we would never say the same about the views you’ll witness when you finally get there.

This popular hike has attractions for both casual hikers who lack the desire or the stamina to stray too far from civilization, and the more adventurous outdoors enthusiasts. Starting at the parking area, follow the trailmarker that points the way to Devil’s Bridge Trail. You’ll find the early going effortless; the trail, originally built for jeep travel, is smooth and clear and leads you through washes filled with juniper and prickly pear cactus.

Area/Length :

  0.8 miles

  Latitude :

34.903223

  Longitude :

-111.81396

  Elevation :

4607 at trailhead

 

Take an easy hike along the bottom of Sterling Canyon. The drainage is dry most of the year. Shade is available, but it would be wise to carry some water in the warm months.Sterling Canyon in northern Arizona near the Grand Canyon Bed and Breakfast

The signed trailhead is on the east side of the parking area. The well maintained trail almost immediately enters Wilderness and climbs gradually in the shade of Arizona cypress beside a dry stream bed on the floor of Sterling Canyon. There are occasional views of red rock formations to the left and of the sheer walls of Lost Wilson Mountain on the right. After .75 miles, the trail enters stands of ponderosa pine and oak which show the scars from the 1996 “Arch” fire.  Nearing the 1.75 mile point, there is a marked fork. Sterling Pass Trail branches off to the right. Keep left and continue 100 yards where the trail ends at a large red rock outcrop. There are nice views of the canyon, mountains and of Vultee Arch, about .25 miles the north.

  Area/Length :

  1.75 miles

  Latitude :

34.937106

  Longitude :

-111.794187

  Elevation :

4803 at trailhead

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