Posts Tagged ‘national park service’

Grand Canyon Anniversary

January 12th, 2015 by Del & Sheryl Terry

President Theodore Roosevelt’s Bold Grand Canyon Move!

On 11 January 1908, President Theodore Roosevelt tested his constitutional powers by protecting the Grand Canyon using a legal loophole. After his first wife’s death, Roosevelt spent extended time in the western part of the United States, and his love of nature was well- documented.

Teddy Roosevelt

In May 1903, President Roosevelt made his first trip to the Grand Canyon and spoke at a public event.

“In the Grand Canyon, Arizona has a natural wonder which, so far as I know, is in kind absolutely unparalleled throughout the rest of the world. I want to ask you to do one thing in connection with it in your own interest and in the interest of the country to keep this great wonder of nature as it now is,” Roosevelt said, aware of efforts to build on the land and to mine the region for minerals.

By 1906, Congress grew concerned with archeological vandalism in the western states region and it debated a new act that would allow for the creation of National Monuments by the President. The Antiquities Act of 1906 was passed by Congress and signed into law by President Roosevelt and it contained language that tried to limit National Monuments “to the smallest area compatible with proper

Grand Canyon National Park Anniversay

care and management of the objects to be protected.” It left the definition of the smallest area compatible to President Roosevelt and granted him the power to establish monuments by executive decree. That was enough for Roosevelt to issue Presidential Proclamation 794 on January 11, 1908, establishing the Grand Canyon National Monument, in the Territory of Arizona. The order allowed for forestry protection in the monument area, and it barred settlement and the destruction of any feature of the “monument.” President Woodrow Wilson signed an act naming the Grand Canyon as a National Park in 1919, giving the National Park Service jurisdiction over the region, instead of the Forest Service.

Canyon Floats Amid Rare Cloud Inversion

December 3rd, 2013 by Del & Sheryl Terry

 Rare cloud inversion over the Grand Canyon

Grand Canyon National Park visitors at Mather Point were greeted with a total  and rare cloud inversion on Friday. Cloud inversions are formed through the interaction of warm and cold air masses. (Photo by Erin Whittaker/National Park Service)

 

rare cloud inversion over the Grand Canyon; https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0/legalcode

Photo supplied from https://www.flickr.com/search/?w=50693818@N08&q=inversion

 

A group of fortunate Grand Canyon visitors and employees were treated to a rare sight this weekend — twice. On Friday and Sunday, the park’s redrock cliffs could be seen rising out of a sea of fog that occupied the inner reaches of the Canyon. The sky above was blue at times, amplifying the effect. Photos posted to the park’s Facebook page quickly went viral on the web. 

The phenomenon is called a total cloud inversion.

And the National Weather Service says it’s a textbook example of how the atmosphere behaves like a liquid. At night, the cold front of clouds falls into the lowest terrain around, the Grand Canyon. As the temperature warms through the day, the clouds push out east, up the Grand Staircase and across the Navajo Nation.

“We get areas of fog, but to have something this widespread and prolonged is pretty rare,” said Megan Schwitzer, a meteorologist with the National Weather Service in Bellemont. “It’s not something that happens every year or even every other year.”

But not everyone was happy at the South Rim. According to National Park Service Ranger Erin Whittaker, some visitors actually complained about the clouds. Others rushed to the rim when they heard about the rare cloud inversion.

“Word spread like wildfire and most ran to the rim to photograph it. What a fantastic treat for all,” she said.

Whittaker said she had waited five years herself to spot the phenomenon. And it was just in the nick of time. Whittaker started her three-month annual furlough on Monday — the day that her photos for the Park Service appeared on worldwide media sites.

More information about the event can be found at http://www.washingtonpost.com/national/in-rare-weather-event-clouds-fill-grand-canyon/2013/12/05/0742b0ce-5d4a-11e3-bc56-c6ca94801fac_gallery.html

 

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