Posts Tagged ‘grand canyon’

A Great Little Mountain Town

July 31st, 2014 by Del & Sheryl Terry

Grand Canyon Bed and Breakfast in Williams, AZ – A Great Little Mountain Town

el Tovar Room of the Grand Canyon Bed and Breakfast in the mountain town on Williams

elTovar Room @ Grand Canyon Bed and Breakfast

Gateway to Canyon in the mountain town of Williams Arizona

Williams, AZ is the Gateway to the Grand Canyon

 

Grand Canyon Bed and Breakfast, is in the great little mountain town of Williams, at the base of Bill Williams Mountain.  The b&b is located less than an hour from the South Rim of the Grand Canyon by car.  It is a rustic wild west bed and breakfast with a woman’s touch, designed to honor the 18th century Anglo, Native American and Spanish American settlers of Northern Arizona.

Founded in 1881, the historic town of Williams, AZ is named for the mountain man, William Shirley Williams.

 

"old" Bill Williams in the mountain town of Williams Arizona

Old Bill 8′ tall bronze statue

Its population was 3,023 at the 2010 census.  It lies on Historic Route 66, Interstate 40,  and the

 

Southwest Chief Amtrak train route. It is

also the southern terminus of the Grand Canyon Railway, which takes visitors to Grand Canyon Village at the South Rim. There are a variety of shops, b&bs, motels, restaurants and gas stations that cater to the large influx of tourists and the local residents.

 

On average December is the coldest month, July is the warmest month, and August is the wettest month. The 30 year  normal high is 83F and the normal low is 22F.

Located in a valley at the base of Bill Williams Mountain, the town is surrounded by Kaibab National Forest.  Downtown is an elevation of a little less than 7000 feet.

Only in Williams will you enjoy the beauty of a mountainside town, the best-preserved stretch of Route 66 still in existence, outdoor adventure to suit every need (including golf, hiking fishing, and fishing),  a rustic setting with cowboys swaggering through town, and a friendly atmosphere greeting you the moment you arrive and bidding you farewell when you depart.

Come stay in one of our rooms or family suites at Grand Canyon Bed and Breakfast and enjoy our great little mountain town.

Hummingbirds to the Kiabab

June 30th, 2014 by Del & Sheryl Terry

Hummingbirds – Five Summer Visitors to the Kaibab

Rufous Often described as “feisty,” the Rufous may have the ideal size-to-weight ratio among North American hummingbirds. This bird out flies all other species, and usually gets its way at feeders at the expense of slower, less-maneuverable hummers. The Rufous has the longest migration route of all US hummingbirds.  It is common in Summer.Rufus hummingbird visiting the Grand Canyon Bed and Breakfast in Northern Arizona

Black-chinned Hummingbirds are very common in the western United States, breeding in West Texas and areas west and north up into Canada. Houston is at the eastern edge of their range and they are relatively common here in summer.. The male’s gorget is mostly black with a difficult-to-see band of violet-purple below.  Females’  plumage above is a more dull green and in a perched position, the wings appear longer with the outer primary feather broader with a blunt curved end.  Another clue to distinguish a Black-chin is that the it usually wags and pumps the tail when hovering. black-chinned hummingbird visiting the Grand Canyon Bed and Breakfast in Northern Arizona

 

Broad-tailed  The male Broad-tailed’s wings make a cricket-like whistle in flight. One female Broad-tailed holds the North American age record, at twelve years old.  A hummingbird of subalpine meadows, and a common visitor, the Broad-tailed Hummingbird ranges across the south-central Rockies in summer. It possesses a number of physiological and behavioral adaptations to survive cold nights, including the ability to enter torpor, slowing its heart rate and dropping its body temperature.Borad-tailed hummingbird visiting the Grand Canyon Bed and Breakfast in Northern Arizona

Calliope  The Calliope prefers high mountains, and has been seen as high as 11,000 feet.  It builds its nests over creeks or over roads next to streams or lakes, usually repairing the previous year’s nest or constructing a new one atop the old. This bird usually forages within five feet of the ground.  It is an occasional visitor in the courtyard and at the back fountain at Grand Canyon Bed and  Breakfast.Calliope hummingbird visiting the Grand Canyon Bed and Breakfast in Northern Arizona

Magnificent!  Occasionally visiting our B&B, and aptly named for its spectacular plumage, the Magnificent Hummingbird is one of several hummingbird species found in southeast Arizona but not regularly elsewhere in the United States. The species was known as Rivoli’s Hummingbird until the mid-1980s. The Magnificent Hummingbird is one of the two largest species. The black bill is long and straight to slightly curved. Both sexes look very dark unless the sun catches the iridescence of the plumage and the brilliant colors flash in the sunlight.

Mule Rides at Canyon Vistas

May 30th, 2014 by Del & Sheryl Terry

View of Grand Canyon National Park at sunset from the South Rim

Canyon Vistas Mule Rides

Once you’ve taken in some of the history and admired the views of Grand Canyon like countless millions before you, it’s time to experience a unique viewing experience.Mule Rides on a trail in the Grand Canyon

Grand Canyon’s ‘long-eared taxis’, mules, depart twice daily (9am & 1 pm), through October, and once daily (10am) through mid-March. from Yaki Barn.

Your three hour adventure starts at the main livery barn in Grand Canyon Village. From there, riders will be transported aboard an interpretive tour bus to Yaki Barn near South Kaibab Trailhead. Here riders join their mules for two hours in the saddle on a four-mile ride that travels along a new trail built by the National Park Service. Wranglers will stop several times along the trail to provide interpretive information about geologic formations, human history, fire ecology, the Colorado River, the area’s native peoples, the surrounding forest and more. The cost of the ride is $114.00 plus tax.

Riders have been hosted by mules through Grand Canyon since 1887.  More than 600,000 tourists have taken advantage of riding rather than walking as they experience  the Park.  Now, for the first time in more than 125 years, you have the opportunity to take a mule a ride along the South Rim as well as down into Grand Canyon.mule rides trail through the Grand Canyon National Park

‘Canyon Vistas’ mule ride, which opened in August of 2013, will have you mere feet from the Canyon’s edge.  Mules (the offspring of a female horse and a male donkey) perfectly suited for the unnerving terrain because of their strength, temperament, and endurance.  It’s actually comforting to know that mules are stubborn.  These Jacks (male) and Jennies (female) don’t do anything that will put themselves in danger.  Mules are more sure-footed than horses, which is an additional bonus.    Because of the placement of their eyes, they can see all four of their hooves, which make it to safe for them to maneuver even the narrowest of trails.http://www.azcentral.com/i/f/9/f/M11_CIFR00d308a166c635a810895a89c5b0cf9f.jpg

Stay with us at Grand Canyon Bed and Breakfast, enjoy our acclaimed hospitality, and include the Canyon Vistas ride as part of your Grand Canyon experience.

Elden Pueblo at Coconino National Forest

May 26th, 2014 by Del & Sheryl Terry

Elden Pueblo at Coconino National Forest near Grand Canyon Bed and Breakfast

Elden Pueblo is the site of an ancient Sinagua (Sin ah’ wa) village,

inhabited from about A.D. 1070 to 1275. The site is unique for a variety of reasons. Most importantly, it makes archaeology and the study of ancient peoples accessible to the public. Since 1978, professional archaeologists have supervised members of the public in excavations, archaeological research techniques and artifact analysis through a variety of public and school programs.

Conveniently located on U.S. Highway 89 north, Elden Pueblo is thought to have been part of a major trading system. This is evidenced by discoveries of trade items, such as macaw skeletons from as far south as Mexico, to shell jewelry from the California Coast. Important discoveries recently uncovered at Elden Pueblo suggest that the Sunset Crater volcano may have erupted over a much longer period of time than previously thought.

The Arizona Natural History Association sponsors the Elden Pueblo Archaeology Project with the Coconino National Forest to provide opportunities for people to learn about and become involved in the science of archaeology. Annual programs include several Public Archaeology Days, in which the public can participate in site tours, actual excavation, artifact washing and analysis, and try their hand at using ancient hunting weapons. The August Public Day features a Primitive Technology Expo and the last Public Day of the year takes place in the fall as part of the annual Flagstaff Festival of Science.

Elden Pueblo is available for school programs and groups of up to thirty people. Educational programs are correlated to the Arizona State Standards, grades 4-7 in Social Science and Science. Custom programs are available, from 1-2 hours tours, to day-long excavations, or multiple-day programs. Elden Pueblo hosts the Arizona Archaeology Society’s summer field school, where avocational archaeologists receive training in various archaeological skills, such as excavation, stabilization, mapping, and laboratory techniques. There are also summer archaeology camps for students, from third grade and up.Archaeology camps at Elden Pueblo in Coconino National Forest near Grand Canyon Bed and Breakfast

Season: The site is open year-‘round for visitation. Brochures for self-guided tours are available on-site. Public programs, school programs, field schools and camps are conducted from Mid-April through October by appointment. Contact the Elden Pueblo Program Manager at (928) 527-3452 to schedule a program.

Facilities: Parking lot. Chemical toilets during the summer field season. An undeveloped camping area with potable water is available for special program participants during the summer.

Dating to the period between AD 1100 -1275 (about 800 years ago), Elden Pueblo is a 60-70 room Sinagua pueblo containing mounds, smaller pueblos, pit houses, and other features. It is located one half mile west of Mt. Elden in Flagstaff, AZ. The modern day Hopi consider the site a special ancestral place called PASIOVI or PAVASIOKI.

Elden Pueblo was first studied in 1926 by archaeologist Jesse Walter Fewkes. Later, the US Forest Service began to study the site and in the process developed a public archaeology education program focused on the following three topics: 1) teaching the public about the lives of the Sinagua people at Elden, 2) field methods in archaeology, and 3) to facilitate on-going research and protection at Elden Pueblo.

Out Of Africa Wildlife Park

May 19th, 2014 by Del & Sheryl Terry

Out of Africa; A Day Trip from Grand Canyon Bed and Breakfast

Tigers – You’ve never seen anything like this before! Witness one or more Bengal and Siberian tigers interact in a predator-and-play relationship, romping and splashing in a large pool as they play with their caretakers and various colorful toys at Out of Africa Wildlife Park

.Tigers performing at Out of Africa Wildlife Park near Grand Canyon Bed and Breakfast

Predator Feed – Follow our animal caretakers on the Predator Feed as they throw 800 pounds of raw food to eagerly waiting carnivores. Plenty of opportunities to take amazing pictures while bears chow down, hyenas laugh, and lions roar.Lions at Out of Africa Wildlife Park near Grand Canyon Bed and Breakfast

Wonders of Wildlife Show – You’ll be fascinated by the antics of our residents, whether it’s grizzly bears at play flopping in the pool, spotted hyenas playing tug-of-war with caretakers, or a walkabout where you’re shown a rare side of exotic animals.Swimming bears at Out of Africa Wildlife Park near Grand Canyon Bed and Breakfast

Creature Feature  - Experience an interactive animal encounter that will introduce you to some of our beloved and popular animal stars ranging from furry, to feathered, to scaly.Children hold constrictor snake at Out of Africa Wildlife Park near Grand Canyon Bed and BreakfastBaby meeting deer at Out of Africa Wildlife Park near Grand Canyon Bed and Breakfast

 

Giant Snake Show – Get behind the myths, and discover the reality of the Giant Snake. Take advantage of this interactive experience and opportunity to look closely. If you choose to, you can even touch and hold some of the world’s largest species. Safe for all ages.

Lounging lions at Out of Africa Wildlife Park near Grand Canyon Bed and Breakfast

Wildlife Preserve – Engage the splendor of the wildlife preserve, composed of the free-roaming Serengeti, the entertainment arena and courts, and spacious habitats located throughout the park. Enjoy by foot or park vehicles.

Some of the animals that live at Out of Africa Wildlife Park are considered to be threatened species. Additionally, we have animals that are considered to be near threatened, which means that they are in danger of being placed in the category of threatened in the future. Out of Africa Wildlife Park works in partnership with our global community to help conserve these animals for our planet. As a friend of Out of Africa Wildlife Park, there are many ways that you can get involved in this effort.

Antelope Slot Canyons

May 13th, 2014 by Del & Sheryl Terry

The Antelope Slot Canyons have been the area’s best kept secrets for generations.  

A photographers dream, as beautiful as some of them are, don’t do Upper and Lower Antelope Canyons justice.  On entering either one, visitors often gasp in wonder.  It’s a must see day trip for photographers of all levels, and greatly recommended for everybody else.

 Upper Antelope Slot Canyon Coconino National Forest Grand Canyon Bed and Breakfast VacationsUpper Antelope Slot Canyon Coconino National Forest Grand Canyon Bed and Breakfast VacationsLower Antelope Slot Canyon Coconino National Forest Grand Canyon Bed and Breakfast VacationsLower Antelope Slot Canyon Coconino National Forest Grand Canyon Bed and Breakfast Vacations

Upper Antelope Slot Canyon                                                          Lower Antelope Slot Canyon

When you take a guided van/boat tour arranged by Grand Canyon Bed and Breakfast, you travel through the beautiful painted desert of Northeastern Arizona arriving at Lake Powell and Antelope Point Marina.  Once arriving, your boat captain will take you deep into the depths of Antelope Canyon  Antelope Slot Canyon Coconino National Forest Grand Canyon Bed and Breakfast Vacations through towering red sandstone walls close enough to touch from either side of the vessel.  During the Summer months you will visit Antelope Island to enjoy your private beach where swimming is allowed.  After your boat trip you will have a deli style lunch before continuing into Upper Antelope Canyon by land.  This is the part of the tour that has become famous with rays of light beaming through the naturally caved out sandstone canyon.  You’ll return to the B&B on your van.

 

Should you decide to drive yourself for a day at Antelope Canyons, you can visit either or both Upper and Lower.  Both Canyons are on Navajo Tribal Land and require a Native guide to take you into them.  You pay for your guide and admission at a booth before you are taken into either of them.

Upper Antelope in entered through a jagged  opening in the wall of a box canyon (see picture on the left in the collage above).  This canyon is the most often photographed of the two because it is the easiest one to carry a camera and tripod into.  The floor of the canyon is fairly level and has a soft sandy base.  When you get to the South end of the canyon, you turn around and walk back out the same opening that you entered.

Lower Antelope is beautiful in a ‘different’ way and requires a little more strenuous level of activity.  You enter thru a ‘slit’ in the sandstone and climb down many sets of ladders (the first of them is depicted in the picture on the right of the collage above) and over sandstone floors as you descend into the earth.

Lower Antelope Slot Canyon Coconino National Forest Grand Canyon Bed and Breakfast VacationsLower Antelope Slot Canyon Coconino National Forest Grand Canyon Bed and Breakfast Vacations

It takes a little more time to visit this canyon.  When you get to the end of this guided tour, you ascend on metal stairs and the see top of the canyon zigzagging across the sandstone on your right.

Float Through The Grand Canyon Colorado River

April 21st, 2014 by Del & Sheryl Terry

In Northern Arizona on the Colorado River,

it is a awe inspiring adventure – a 1 day river trip in one the most famous canyons in the world.  Available May through September this Grand Canyon Colorado River trip is relaxing as you’re moving through the gorge and hiking up side canyons, and being disconnected from the civilized world.

As one of your ‘day trips’,

Stay at Grand Canyon Bed and Breakfast and let us make your reservations for a 1 dayGrand Canyon Bed and Breakfast near the Colorado River

fifteen mile smooth water float trip which includes a shopping trip to Historic Cameron Trading Post on the Navajo Nation. Towering cliffs, pictographs, cool emerald green water, the smell of the Colorado River, and the call of a Great Blue Heron are just a few of many to arouse the senses on this nature experience.

 

We can make reservations for you with as little as two weeks advance notice BUT we suggest that you book your Colorado River experience as early as possible.  Just let us know the date you want to take your rafting trip when you reserve your room to stay with us and we’ll handle all arrangements.  The guided river trip runs March thru October each year.

Here is some information you need to know:

Rafting the calm waters of the Colorado River

Rafting the calm waters of the Colorado River

 

Personal Gear Packing List For River Runners

Waterproof shorts (light weight, fast drying material)

Lightweight pants & T-shirt

Towel

Tennis/athletic shoes or river-type sandals

Bandanna , hat with retention strap or visor

Lightweight jacket or fleece sweatshirt

Sunglasses with strap

Sun block

Camera/video camera*

*cameras should have straps. We are not responsible for damaged equipment.

Note: there is no place to recharge batteries. Also the

Tour the Grand Canyon by Boat or Whitewater Raft

January 7th, 2014 by Del & Sheryl Terry

For the Grand Canyon in Northern Arizona,

it remains the granddad of all adventures.

river trip through the most famous canyon in the world.  The 144,500 mile long Colorado River snakes its way through the canyon and flows all the way to Mexico. Grand Canyon Colorado River trips often become life-changing as moving through the gorge, running its rapids and being disconnected from the civilized world for as much as three weeks is bound to alter a person forever.White wter rafting in the Colorado River of the Grand Canyon Seated on a rock overlooking the Colorado River, it’s hard to imagine life getting much better than on a river trip, watching the sun come up over the Grand Canyon. Rafting the Canyon is a religious experience for many of the thousands of boaters who ply the waters.

Both motorized and non-motorized boat tours on the Colorado river are available. Motorized boat tours  offer riders a chance to walk around on the raft while floating. Non-motorized boat tours offer a chance to enjoy the canyon at the pace of the Colorado river. Riders may choose to raft down whitewater or smooth water sections of the river on either single or multiple-day trips

 

While it usually requires reservations and a long wait, whitewater rafting the Colorado River thru the Grand Canyon is worth it.  Most guests book a year or two or more in advance to get the dates they want.  Some people choose a taste of the river with a 3 day motor trip from Lee’s Ferry to Phantom Ranch.  You can also start your 3 day trip at Phantom Ranch and get off the River at Diamond Creek.  Other guests go for the longer trips that cover a good deal of the Canyon’s 277 river miles.

More than a dozen companies offer trips of various lengths and styles.

Suggested URL is: Plan Your Trip

 

Canyon Floats Amid Rare Cloud Inversion

December 3rd, 2013 by Del & Sheryl Terry

 Rare cloud inversion over the Grand Canyon

Grand Canyon National Park visitors at Mather Point were greeted with a total  and rare cloud inversion on Friday. Cloud inversions are formed through the interaction of warm and cold air masses. (Photo by Erin Whittaker/National Park Service)

 

rare cloud inversion over the Grand Canyon; https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0/legalcode

Photo supplied from https://www.flickr.com/search/?w=50693818@N08&q=inversion

 

A group of fortunate Grand Canyon visitors and employees were treated to a rare sight this weekend — twice. On Friday and Sunday, the park’s redrock cliffs could be seen rising out of a sea of fog that occupied the inner reaches of the Canyon. The sky above was blue at times, amplifying the effect. Photos posted to the park’s Facebook page quickly went viral on the web. 

The phenomenon is called a total cloud inversion.

And the National Weather Service says it’s a textbook example of how the atmosphere behaves like a liquid. At night, the cold front of clouds falls into the lowest terrain around, the Grand Canyon. As the temperature warms through the day, the clouds push out east, up the Grand Staircase and across the Navajo Nation.

“We get areas of fog, but to have something this widespread and prolonged is pretty rare,” said Megan Schwitzer, a meteorologist with the National Weather Service in Bellemont. “It’s not something that happens every year or even every other year.”

But not everyone was happy at the South Rim. According to National Park Service Ranger Erin Whittaker, some visitors actually complained about the clouds. Others rushed to the rim when they heard about the rare cloud inversion.

“Word spread like wildfire and most ran to the rim to photograph it. What a fantastic treat for all,” she said.

Whittaker said she had waited five years herself to spot the phenomenon. And it was just in the nick of time. Whittaker started her three-month annual furlough on Monday — the day that her photos for the Park Service appeared on worldwide media sites.

More information about the event can be found at http://www.washingtonpost.com/national/in-rare-weather-event-clouds-fill-grand-canyon/2013/12/05/0742b0ce-5d4a-11e3-bc56-c6ca94801fac_gallery.html

 

Experience a Grand Canyon Winter

December 28th, 2012 by Del & Sheryl Terry

Snow capped canyon peaks; grand canyon winter; grand canyon winter

Snowy view from the South Rim

Experience a Grand Canyon winter and enjoy this Northern Arizona natural wonder.

 

Most people think of Arizona and envision desert landscapes complete with saguaro cactus and hot temperatures, but our Grand Canyon State is full of surprises.  What better way to treat yourselves to a very special Arizona vacation than to visit one of the Seven Natural Wonders of the World this fall and winter and experience a different side of Grand Canyon, one that many people don’t even realize exists!

 

 

 

 

The snow has begun to fall in Northern Arizona, making this a great time to experience the cozy warmth of the radiant heat gas fireplaces and the warm hospitality of Grand Canyon Bed and Breakfast

 

You can also enjoy staying warm and viewing the winter scenery while others do the driving as you ‘motor’ to the Rim and tour Grand Canyon National Park on a small group van tour.  Let a professional driver navigate what can be the snowy/icy roads of the High Plains and the Kaibab Plateau and teach you about the flora and fauna as well as the geology of one of the Seven Natural Wonders of the World.

 

Grand Canyon Railway in a snow storm returning to the Depot

Another option is to ‘ride the rails’ aboard a vintage train along the century-old line leading from Williams, AZ to the Grand Canyon!

You’ll be sure to keep warm on your journey to the heart of the historic Grand Canyon South Rim Village.  Once you arrive at Grand Canyon, you’ll enjoy a much calmer and quieter visit this time of year as the summer crowds have cleared and the fall has quickly turned into winter.  This truly is a wonderful time of year to enjoy all that Grand Canyon has to offer — from spectacular vistas that just might be dusted in a beautiful layer of snow to the grand lobby of the historic El Tovar Hotel or Bright Angel Lodge with  blazing fireplaces welcoming guests inside to enjoy your winter afternoon!

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