Posts Tagged ‘arizona parks’

Watchtower, Desert View

March 5th, 2015 by Del & Sheryl Terry

Desert View Watchtower,

is one of the most prominent architectural features on the South Rim of Grand Canyon National Park. The watchtower is located at the Easternmost view point once you enter the Park on Hwy 64 coming from the Navajo community of Cameron on Hwy 89. From a distance, the building’s silhouette looks like the Anasazi watchtower of which it was meant to imitate.

File:Yavapai Observation Station.jpgDesert View Watchtower, Grand Canyon

The watchtower was designed by the renowned early 20th century architect Mary Elizabeth Jane Colter in collaboration with some of the renowned Hopi artisans of the day.  The original steel and concrete structure of the observation level is hidden from sight behind plaster, stone and wood. Murals by well-known Hope artist Fred Kabotie are featured prominently on the second level of the circular stairwell. The main space is the Kiva Room in the base structure, apparently roofed with logs that were salvaged from the old Grandview Hotel. The Watchtower is part of the Desert View Watchtower Historic District, which includes a number of support structures built and used by the Fred Harvey Company. Later used by the National Park Service, the Desert View Watchtower was designated a United States National Historic Landmark in May 28, 1987 as a collective nomination.

Desert View Watchtower, Grand Canyon National Park http://worldonabike.com/files/2009/04/20090228img-2755grand-canyon-1.jpg  From the top floor of the tower, you may see the varied colors of the Painted Desert and the Navajo Nation (the largest Native American reservation in the US) to the East, and the confluence of the Little Colorado River and the Colorado River to the North.  Access from balcony to balcony is provided by small accessible stairways and to the West you can see the majesty and beauty of the 13 mile wide Grand Canyon. The tower rises as an open shaft lined by circular balconies overlooking the central space whose engineering was provided by the Atchison, Topeka & Santa Fe Railway.

 

Mule Rides at Canyon Vistas

May 30th, 2014 by Del & Sheryl Terry

View of Grand Canyon National Park at sunset from the South Rim

Canyon Vistas Mule Rides

Once you’ve taken in some of the history and admired the views of Grand Canyon like countless millions before you, it’s time to experience a unique viewing experience.Mule Rides on a trail in the Grand Canyon

Grand Canyon’s ‘long-eared taxis’, mules, depart twice daily (9am & 1 pm), through October, and once daily (10am) through mid-March. from Yaki Barn.

Your three hour adventure starts at the main livery barn in Grand Canyon Village. From there, riders will be transported aboard an interpretive tour bus to Yaki Barn near South Kaibab Trailhead. Here riders join their mules for two hours in the saddle on a four-mile ride that travels along a new trail built by the National Park Service. Wranglers will stop several times along the trail to provide interpretive information about geologic formations, human history, fire ecology, the Colorado River, the area’s native peoples, the surrounding forest and more. The cost of the ride is $114.00 plus tax.

Riders have been hosted by mules through Grand Canyon since 1887.  More than 600,000 tourists have taken advantage of riding rather than walking as they experience  the Park.  Now, for the first time in more than 125 years, you have the opportunity to take a mule a ride along the South Rim as well as down into Grand Canyon.mule rides trail through the Grand Canyon National Park

‘Canyon Vistas’ mule ride, which opened in August of 2013, will have you mere feet from the Canyon’s edge.  Mules (the offspring of a female horse and a male donkey) perfectly suited for the unnerving terrain because of their strength, temperament, and endurance.  It’s actually comforting to know that mules are stubborn.  These Jacks (male) and Jennies (female) don’t do anything that will put themselves in danger.  Mules are more sure-footed than horses, which is an additional bonus.    Because of the placement of their eyes, they can see all four of their hooves, which make it to safe for them to maneuver even the narrowest of trails.http://www.azcentral.com/i/f/9/f/M11_CIFR00d308a166c635a810895a89c5b0cf9f.jpg

Stay with us at Grand Canyon Bed and Breakfast, enjoy our acclaimed hospitality, and include the Canyon Vistas ride as part of your Grand Canyon experience.

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