Arizona Autumn

November 12th, 2014 by Del & Sheryl Terry

Arizona Autumn colors showing in the courtyard of the Grand Canyon Bed and Breakfast

Arizona Autumn colors showing in the rearyard of the Grand Canyon Bed and Breakfast

Arizona Autumn colors draping the yard of the Grand Canyon Bed and Breakfast

Arizona Autumn colors shining in the trees of the Grand Canyon Bed and Breakfast

Arizona Autumn colors showing in the trees of the Grand Canyon Bed and BreakfastAn Arizona autumn can be breathtaking in the north and the Grand Canyon Bed and Breakfast features many beautiful plants and trees showing their beauty of the coming season and preparing for a classic winter. The grounds of the Grand Canyon Bed and Breakfast are designed for simplicity and improve the landscape while using minimum water. With the backdrop of Bill Williams Mountain and the curtain of clouds bringing rain or snow the weather is ideal for expression and art. Arizona autumns are mild and comfortable before the winter crawls in and provides a whole other world of skiing, and cozy fireplaces.

Restful Vacations

November 6th, 2014 by Del & Sheryl Terry

Restful Vacations; the front courtyard and guest retreat at the Grand Canyon Bed and Breakfast in Williams Arizona
Welcome to the Grand Canyon Bed and Breakfast, where your restful vacations begin

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Northern Arizona Restful Vacations

There is nothing more serene than watching the Rocky Mountains from a quiet and comfortable space. The Grand Canyon Bed and Breakfast has provided just such a treasured getaway for 6 years and enjoys sharing this luxury with guests from all over the world in their desire for restful vacations. The landscaping is lush and beautiful, boasting mostly drought resistant plants and watered with reclaimed water. Del and Sheryl pride themselves on keeping their home running green and environmentally friendly to aid Northern Arizona in their efforts to preserve the beauty of the landscape and surrounding history. The wonderful sounds of a happy fountain cascade and bounce along the rocks thanks to a recirculating pump.

 

The expressive clouds can be viewed from around the structure and regularly provide a fabulous show ending with Arizona’s famous and spectacular sunsets. Whether you have spent a day sight seeing or hiking, shopping or wandering, you can return to luxury and contentment in spacious rooms.

 

For more information on booking accommodations at the Grand Canyon Bed and Breakfast please visit Availability. It is always the perfect time of year to enjoy the mountains.Restful Vacations; the private backyard of the Grand Canyon Bed and Breakfast Enjoy a restful vacation at the Grand Canyon Bed and Breakfast in Williams Arizona

Antique Halloween

November 3rd, 2014 by Del & Sheryl Terry

Antique clock with shelf decorated with dried gourds for fall and antique halloween

Antique frame and chalk board with gourds decorated for an antique halloween

This Autumn the Grand Canyon Bed and Breakfast is decorating an Antique Halloween. The mantles are dripping with gourds and leaves dried and preserved for their spectacular beauty. The gourds come from last year’s project and the instructions for making them are found HERE. The black board was made using masonite and black board paint cut to fit the antique frame. hung with ribbon. Once the paint is dry the board must be “seasoned” with the side of a piece of chalk. Follow Sheryl on Pinterest for more of her decorating ideas.

Antique frame and chalk board with gourds decorated for an antique halloween

Shoshone Point

October 10th, 2014 by Del & Sheryl Terry

Ametuer phtographer shot of Grand Canyon from Shoshone Point; guest of the Grand Canyon Bed and BreakfastThom & Judy Rogers (from Florida) stayed with us for a few days this past August and while here took some pictures, actually many pictures of Shoshone Point at the Grand Canyon.  Ametuer phtographer shot of Grand Canyon from Shoshone Point; guest of the Grand Canyon Bed and BreakfastHere are a few of them that they would like to share with our past guests, future guests, and any one else who loves the Grand Canyon as much as Del & I do.  ENJOY!Ametuer phtographer shot of Grand Canyon from Shoshone Point; guest of the Grand Canyon Bed and Breakfast

Northern Arizona Native American Events

September 11th, 2014 by Del & Sheryl Terry

http://ag.arizona.edu/pubs/general/azlp47-2/map1.jpg

Buying Native American Indian art and crafts directly from the men and women who make them can be a highlight of a visit to Northern Arizona.

 You’re not only getting treasured mementos of your trip, but you’re also investing in the continuing traditions of the artists who created them.  Deciding what and where to purchase, and ensuring that the items are genuine, is not always easy.  Four tips are: check the label, question the origins, study before you get there, and ask for documentation.

 

The following are year-long festivals close to Grand Canyon Bed and Breakfast and their URLs to learn specific dates and address:

 

October

Tu’Nanaees’ Dizi Dine Fair – Western www.dinefair.com Tuba City

Tuhisma Hopi Arts & Crafts Market http://hopeputave.net/5.html Kykotsmovi

 

May

Native American Arts Auction www.friendsofhubbell.org Ganado

Zuni Festival of Arts & Culture www.musnaz.org Flagstaff

 

June

Hopi Festival of Arts & Culture www.musnaz.org Flagstaff

 

The Arizona Trail

August 27th, 2014 by Del & Sheryl Terry

The Arizona Trail was the dream of Dale Shewalter

He envisioned a cross-state trail in the 1970s, and in 1985, while he was working as a Flagstaff schoolteacher, walked from Nogales to the Utah state line to explore the feasibility of a trail traversing Arizona.  Immediately thereafter, Dale began traveling around the state giving presentations on his vision of a trail connecting communities, mountains, canyons, deserts, forests, public lands, historic sites, various trail systems, wilderness areas, and other points of interest.  The idea was embraced by all types of trails users throughout Arizona, and by Arizona State Parks and the Kaibab, Coronado, Coconino, and Tonto National Forests, the Bureau of Land Management, and National Parks Service.Panoramic view of Arizona Trail across the state parks region

Inventory work was needed on determining the existing trails that could be interconnected to be designated as part of the Arizona Trail, and at the same time, where new trails would be needed to traverse Arizona’s diverse landscapes.   In the late 1980′s, Dale was hired by the Kaibab National Forest to be the first paid coordinator for the Arizona Trail, and all agencies began establishing segments of the Arizona Trail.Arizona Trail in the Kiabab National Forest

By 1990, two needs became apparent – a formal partnership among all governmental agencies was necessary to better coordinate efforts and communication, and a non-profit organization for the trail was needed.  Using monies from all four National Forests, Bureau of Land Management, National Park Service, and funding of its own, Arizona State Parks assumed the lead role and employed paid coordinators for the Arizona Trail throughout the 1990s.Arizona Trail funded by four national parks

In 1994, the Arizona Trail Association became an organized voice for the trail, and brought together passionate day hikers, backpackers, equestrians, mountain bicyclists, runners, trail builders, nature enthusiasts, cross-country skiers, and llama packers from throughout the state.  These committed individuals (then and even more so today) provided the necessary route identification to “close the gaps” of the trail, provided the necessary volunteers for building and maintaining the trail, created maps and provided GPS coordinates, identified water sources and resupply points, and raised money and awareness for the trail.Arizona Trail has an association that organizes and voices needs for the trail

Also in the 1990s and continuing today, various trail crews that spend extended periods of time working on the trail have contributed greatly.  These include various youth corps crews, Sierra Club service trips, American Hiking Society Volunteer Vacations, scouting and college groups, Volunteers for Outdoor Arizona, REI service trips, Backcountry Horsemen of America, International Mountain Bicycling Association – Subaru Trail Care Crews, and many more.  These trail crews can spend extended periods of time in the backcountry, where logistics can be challenging for the typical weekend volunteer work project.Arizona Trail cleaned and maintained by corporate sponsers

Since 2000, some very significant milestones have been reached that originally seemed very difficult to achieve.  These include:   working to reestablish the trail in areas severely affected by major wildfires; traversing the challenging topography north of the Gila River; working through landowner opposition west of the San Francisco Peaks; developing outstanding maps and GPS information to better assist trail users through the remote areas along the trail. It is the above milestones that brought the Arizona Trail to its current completed state.

The Arizona Trail has become one of the premier long distance trails in the country.  The diversity of people that have made this happen are as diverse as the trail itself. The Arizona Trail demonstrates what trail users and land managers can accomplish when they share a common vision.

Interactive Arizona Trail Map

For an Interactive map click here

Desert View Watchtower

August 22nd, 2014 by Del & Sheryl Terry

Desert View Watchtower is one of the most prominent architectural features on the South Rim of Grand Canyon National Park

Desert View Watchtower in the Grand Canyon close to the Bed and Breakfast in WilliamsDesert View Watchtower in the Grand Canyon close to the Bed and Breakfast in Williams  The tower is located at the Easternmost view point once you enter the Park on Hwy 64 coming from the Navajo community of Cameron on Hwy 89.

The watchtower was designed by the renowned early 20th century architect Mary Elizabeth Jane Colter in collaboration with some of the renowned Hopi artisans of the day.  Murals by well-known Hope artist Fred Kabotie are featured prominently on the second level of the circular stairwell.

View of Painted Desert from Desert View Watchtower; http://worldonabike.com/files/2009/04/20090228img-2755grand-canyon-1.jpg  From the top floor of the tower, you see the varied colors of the Painted Desert and the Navajo Nation (the largest Native American reservation in the US) to the East, and the confluence of the Little Colorado River and the Colorado River to the North.  To the West you see the majesty of the 13 mile wide Grand Canyon.

Polar Express

August 15th, 2014 by Del & Sheryl Terry

The POLAR EXPRESS

Polar Express by the Grand Canyon Railway from November to December 2014

It’s Santa on the Polar Express

THE POLAR EXPRESS – 2014

“ALL ABOARD THE POLAR EXPRESS FOR A JOURNEY TO THE NORTH POLE TO SEE SANTA!”

Here is a very special chance for you and the entire family to experience the magic of The Polar Express™, the classic children’s book by Chris Van Allsburg.

This Winter weekend, from November 7th thru January 3rd, the Grand Canyon Railway’s Polar Express comes to life on a journey from the nighttime wilderness of Williams, Arizona, to the enchanted beauty of “the North Pole”—where Santa Claus and his reindeer are waiting with a keepsake present for every good boy and girl. You’ll be smiling from ear to ear, as you watch children’s faces light up when the train arrives, and enjoy hot chocolate and cookies while listening to this timeless story.

Make this a family holiday tradition, and call today to make your reservations (because space is limited to those who truly believe in the spirit of Christmas). The ride lasts a little over an hour, with the train leaving each night at 5:30 p.m. and 7:30 p.m., as well as select days that feature a 3:30 p.m. matinee departure. Prices are $39 for Adults and $25 for children.  Christmas Eve rates are $69 & $43 (all $$ plus tax).Every Children receives a bell from the Polar Express by the Grand Canyon Railway

 

Once you’ve reserved your tickets for The Polar Express, your family is excited to go to the North Pole. So now what? The following information will help you plan your trip to maximize the magic.Polar Express Cast by the Grand Canyon Railway 2014

First book your reservations to stay the night at Grand Canyon Bed and breakfast.

Grand Canyon Railway’s The Polar Express is a magical, nighttime train adventure to the “North Pole.” During the holiday season The Polar Express departs the Williams Depot in Williams, AZ, and takes you and your family on a journey through the moonlit wilderness.

Much like in the book and movie, guests can expect a lively bunch of elves, chefs and other characters to provide constant entertainment. Photo-ops are plentiful as you are encouraged to sing, dance and act out old fashioned holiday songs, and read along to The Polar Express story. Fill up on sugar cookies and hot chocolate provided by Santa’s chefs just before you arrive at the North Pole.

Upon arrival to Santa’s Village, the train will fill with anticipation as Santa makes his way on his visit to each, visiting every boy, girl, mom and dad, leaving them with a special gift as the train returns to the Williams Depot.

Sheri and Del can book your reservations on The Polar Express for you, BUT do it early because it fills up quickly.  Call us @ 928-635-0657.

 

Native American of Northern Arizona

August 5th, 2014 by Del & Sheryl Terry

The Hopi, Navajo, and Havasupai Native American cultures have the closet ties to Grand Canyon.  All three have their creation ‘stories’  originating here.

You can experience the home of these three peoples today as you visit the Indian Nations around Grand Canyon Bed and Breakfast.

For more than 40,000 visitors a year, the famed Havasu Falls on the Havasupai Reservation is where it’s at when it comes to Grand Canyon.  Located in a side canyon that opens onto the Colorado river, Havasu Creek (which originates as Cataract Creek in Williams, AZ)  drops along four major falls, the most popular and scenic being Havasu Falls.  A campground located just downstream from the falls offers the perfect oasis getaway.  Because a hike or backpack trip, is eight miles one way, and the hike farther down canyon can lead to several more miles of exploration, it is a high adventure experience.

Native American History Havasu Falls near the Grand Canyon Bed and Breakfast; http://www.wildbackpacker.com/wp-content/uploads/havasufallsfromtrail.jpg

Covering 27,000 square miles (70,000 square kilometers), the Navajo Nation is the single largest Native American reservation in the United States.  Because this area consists of vast stretches of open land a car is necessary to get around. Be sure to fill up your gas tank when you have the opportunity. Service stations are few and far between in this region.  The characteristic folk art of the Navajo is the Navajo rug (or blanket). Each region of the reservation has its own characteristic style of weavings, with a few patterns that can be found reservation-wide. As with other folk art, quality and prices vary wildly; small items for the tourist trade can be had for as little as $20 or so, while a gigantic, museum-quality (but brand-new rather than antique) rug from the prestigious “Two Grey Hills” region sold for $60,000 at an Indian market a few years ago. The key thing to remember is that the value of a particular weaving is the value you place on it. If you see a piece you like, haggle over price if you wish; if you don’t get the price you want, look for another one. Also, look for Navajo turquoise/silver jewelry. The closest location to our B&B to experience Navajo culture, art and food is at Cameron Trading Post on the ‘Rez’

. Native American Cameron Trading Post near Grand Canyon Bed and Breakfast; http://www.toadlenatradingpost.com/images/home/generations_350x200.jpg

To experience first-hand one of the most studied and revered Native American cultures in the country, visit the Hopi Nation. The Hopi Tribe is a sovereign nation located in northeastern Arizona. The reservation occupies part of Coconino and Navajo counties, encompasses more than 1.5 million acres, and is made up of 12 villages on three mesas.  Hopi art is characterized by their pottery and hand carve kachina.

Since time immemorial the Hopi people have lived in Hopituskwa and have maintained there sacred covenant with Maasaw, the ancient caretaker of the earth, to live as peaceful and humble farmers respectful of the land and its resources. Over the centuries they have survived as a tribe, and to this day have managed to retain there culture, language and religion despite influences from the outside world.

Native American Culture Kachina Dolls; http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/8/81/Kachina_dolls.jpg

A Great Little Mountain Town

July 31st, 2014 by Del & Sheryl Terry

Grand Canyon Bed and Breakfast in Williams, AZ – A Great Little Mountain Town

el Tovar Room of the Grand Canyon Bed and Breakfast in the mountain town on Williams

elTovar Room @ Grand Canyon Bed and Breakfast

Gateway to Canyon in the mountain town of Williams Arizona

Williams, AZ is the Gateway to the Grand Canyon

 

Grand Canyon Bed and Breakfast, is in the great little mountain town of Williams, at the base of Bill Williams Mountain.  The b&b is located less than an hour from the South Rim of the Grand Canyon by car.  It is a rustic wild west bed and breakfast with a woman’s touch, designed to honor the 18th century Anglo, Native American and Spanish American settlers of Northern Arizona.

Founded in 1881, the historic town of Williams, AZ is named for the mountain man, William Shirley Williams.

 

"old" Bill Williams in the mountain town of Williams Arizona

Old Bill 8′ tall bronze statue

Its population was 3,023 at the 2010 census.  It lies on Historic Route 66, Interstate 40,  and the

 

Southwest Chief Amtrak train route. It is

also the southern terminus of the Grand Canyon Railway, which takes visitors to Grand Canyon Village at the South Rim. There are a variety of shops, b&bs, motels, restaurants and gas stations that cater to the large influx of tourists and the local residents.

 

On average December is the coldest month, July is the warmest month, and August is the wettest month. The 30 year  normal high is 83F and the normal low is 22F.

Located in a valley at the base of Bill Williams Mountain, the town is surrounded by Kaibab National Forest.  Downtown is an elevation of a little less than 7000 feet.

Only in Williams will you enjoy the beauty of a mountainside town, the best-preserved stretch of Route 66 still in existence, outdoor adventure to suit every need (including golf, hiking fishing, and fishing),  a rustic setting with cowboys swaggering through town, and a friendly atmosphere greeting you the moment you arrive and bidding you farewell when you depart.

Come stay in one of our rooms or family suites at Grand Canyon Bed and Breakfast and enjoy our great little mountain town.

Hike to the Top of Humphreys Peak

July 25th, 2014 by Del & Sheryl Terry

                                                   Humphreys Peak outside Williams Arizona near the Grand Canyon Bed and Breakfast

East of the  town of Williams is the highest point in Arizona.

Humphreys Peak is the tallest peak in the San Francisco Peaks (upper left), but is often hidden from view on I-17 behind the second tallest mountain in the State, Agassiz Peak (12,360 ft).  From the top, you can see all the way to Grand Canyon (a little more than 70 mile

The nine-mile-round-trip hike officially begins around 9,500 feet in elevation at Arizona Snowbowl.  The main trailhead is located on a parking lot to the left of Snowbowl Road as it passes into the developed ski area.  However, hikers can save about a mile of walking by driving up to the upper lodge of Snowbowl for the second of two trailheads.  A spur trail from this lodge connects with the Humphreys Trail, though some locals consider this the unofficial route of ascent.

From there, the trail winds thru a dense alpine forest and steadily ascends to a ridgeline.  From here, the trail heads to a saddle located between Humphreys and Agassiz Peaks.  Due to threat of a rare plant species, ascending to the top of Agassiz is not permitted.

The Humphreys Trail continues as a cinder path, a little more than a mile from the saddle to the peak. Expect high winds and sprawling and spectacular views in all directions.Humphreys trail at Humphreys Peak in Williams Arizona close to Grand Canyon Bed and Breakfast.

The San Francisco Peaks are the remains of an eroded stratovolcano which erupted around 200,000 years ago (before eruption, 16,000 ft).

A stratovolcano is a tall, conical volcano composed of one layer of hardened lava, tephra, and volcanic ash.  Plan on spending the day between nights at Grand Canyon Bed and Breakfast and spend a day on Humphreys Peak.

Grand Canyon Caverns

July 21st, 2014 by Del & Sheryl Terry

Grand Canyon Caverns located on the Coconino Plateau,

the Caverns lie within an alluvial plain at an altitude of about 5,300 feet (1,600 m) above sea level. Limestone comprises the vast majority of the subsurface area of this vicinity of the Coconino Plateau, an area riddled with numerous cavernous veins that run for miles in all directions.Grand Canyon Taverns off Rte 66; http://www.gokingman.com/media/uploads/images/Grand-Canyon-Caverns-300px-.jpg

Just 66 miles West of Williams ,AZ on Route 66, the Caverns lie 230 feet (70 m) below ground level. They are among the largest of dry caverns in the United States. Dry caverns are a rarity in that as little as 3% of caverns in the world are dry. Because of this fact, stalagmites and stalactites are very few in numbers. The caverns are enormous, with measurements showing that the length of 3 football fields could fit snugly within its boundaries.

345 million years ago, during the Mississippian Period, the southwest United States was enveloped by the ocean. Sea creatures died over the millions of years, their skeletons created a mud-like paste with a dense amount of lime. This eventually hardened into the limestone bedrock, which can be seen in the caverns today. As millions of years came and went, the bedrock was pushed up, to over 5,000 feet (1,500 m) above sea level. These methodical events split the crust of the Earth, releasing water into what is now the caverns.Grand Canyon Caverns off Rte 66; http://t2.gstatic.com/images?q=tbn:ANd9GcTAL3tZ_H5Rdf1vmTBPXH6FukaB8j-RqUEhB3YAXtqHxuo4VN8i

Approximately 35 million years ago, huge amounts of rainfall carrying a mildly acidic element flowed into the caverns. This solution eventually crept its way through the cracks and caves ultimately contributing to the Colorado River. Millions of years later the evaporating water leaving calcium deposits began decorating the walls and floors, creating wondrous and beautiful formations that can still be viewed by the public today.

Contemporary History

In 1927, Walter Peck, a cowboy and woodcutter, was walking through the area on his way to play poker with his friends. when he stumbled and nearly fell into a sizable hole in the ground. The following morning, Peck, and some of his friends returned to the location of the large, funnel shaped hole with lanterns and ropes. Peck was lowered into the hole by his friends with a rope tied around his waist to a depth of 150 feet (46 m) with a lantern and began exploring.

A very large, dark cavern welcomed Peck during his initial exploration where he saw some speckles on the walls that he thought were gold. He gathered up samples of some of these shiny rocks and had his friends pull him back to the surface. Peck then purchased the property and began making preparations for a gold mining operation. Once the assay reports were completed he learned that his potential mother lode was nothing more than iron oxide.Grand Canyon Caverns off Rte 66; http://t3.gstatic.com/images?q=tbn:ANd9GcRhGLetIT1O3rTpq_DQTRL3YwJvkCnZtdYG7nGAlXXm2PBhfp8-nQ

Not one to give up on entrepreneurial opportunities, Peck came up with an idea to lure travelers to the Caverns and began charging 25 cents to lower these early spelunkers down into the Caverns to explore and to view what had been reported in newspapers to be the remains of a caveman that had earlier been located on a ledge. Although the ‘caveman’ had also lured scientist from the east to study the remains, it was later confirmed in the 1960s to be the remains of two inhabitants of the area. These inhabitants had been in the area barely a decade earlier during the winter of 1917-1918, when a group of Indians were harvesting and cutting firewood on the caverns hilltop and a snow storm trapped them for three days. Two brothers died from a flu epidemic and since the ground was frozen solid with deep snow cover, their fellow lumberjacks buried them in what they thought was only a 50-foot (15 m) hole because returning them to their tribal headquarters in Peach Springs, risked spreading the flu.

An entrance was built into the Caverns by blasting a 210-foot (64 m) shaft in the limestone and installing a large elevator at which time the natural entrance was also sealed off at the request of the Hualapai as it was considered a sacred burial place. Near the natural entrance, the skeletal remains of a giant and extinct ground sloth were found; it lived during the Age of Mammals when the Woolly Mammoth and Saber Tooth Cat lived more than 11,000 years ago. The study of the remains indicate it stood over 15 feet (4.6 m) tall and weighed near 2,000 pounds.Grand Canyon Caverns off Rte 66; http://www.utchs.com/Grand_Canyon_Caverns/IMG_0342.jpg

In 1962, the Caverns were renamed, Grand Canyon Caverns, with good reason, as it is connected to the Grand Canyon to the north.  They are an  Historic Route 66 roadside tourist attraction that has survived into the current century with nearly 100,000 tourists annually.

Features

Grand Canyon Caverns is the largest dry caverns in the United States and maybe the largest dry cavern system on earth as they are still being explored and documented by both amateur and professional spelunkers, archaeologists, geologists and other varieties of scientists. At a constant 57 degrees with only a 2 percent humidity year round the Caverns are an ideal preservatory.  Air comes into the caverns from the Grand Canyon through 60 miles (97 km) of limestone caves. (See picture of opening at end of article). Scientists were curious as to how far the caverns extended and looked for a safe means of finding out. Rather than explore the canyons, which could take years, red smoke flares were ignited by University of Arizona students, and two weeks later red smoke was seen protruding from vents, near Supai, AZ, in the Grand Canyon, thus the name.  Supai Falls near Grand Canyon Caverns; http://photos2.demandstudios.com/dm-resize/photos.demandstudios.com%2Fgetty%2Farticle%2F88%2F114%2F87672387_XS.jpg?w=400&h=10000&keep_ratio=1

Spelunkers and tourists alike can take a 45-minute, guided, walking tour of the Caverns beginning with a 21-story, or 210-foot (64 m) descent from the earth’s surface in a large elevator, or a shorter 25-minute wheelchair accessible tour. The more hardcore and professional spelunkers can explore on their own, with the proper permission of course, areas that are never seen by the ordinary tours.

The first cavern that one enters after their descent by elevator is the Chapel of the Ages cavern room which is so large it could hold up to two football fields. There have been numerous weddings performed in this room throughout the years. The most popular guided walking tour is about 3/4 of a mile long through winding, natural tunnels where guests will see helecite crystals, a rather rare form of selenite, red-wall limestone, ‘teacup handles’, ‘winter crystals’ and more.  The Caverns are a popular natural feature of this vast recreational area in Northern Arizona.

Grand Canyon Deer Farm

July 8th, 2014 by Del & Sheryl Terry

Grand Canyon Deer Farm near Williams, Arizona

Have you ever wanted to pet a deer?  Can you imagine your picture taken with a deer close enough to hug?

Grand Canyon Deer Farm https://fbcdn-sphotos-e-a.akamaihd.net/hphotos-ak-ash2/s720x720/530004_405565136130444_1396360490_n.jpg When you visit Grand Canyon Deer Farm, you walk with a herd of Fallow Deer that are tame enough to eat out of your hand and that love to be petted.

Grand Canyon Deer Farm https://scontent-b-sjc.xx.fbcdn.net/hphotos-frc3/s720x720/306055_258251244195168_2079440_n.jpg

The Fallow Deer are living among wallabies, marmoset, coatimundis, zebu, & mini-horses & donkeys.  There is also a cockatoo & parrot.

You’ll also get up close and personal with a reindeer or two.

Grand Canyon Deer Farm https://scontent-b-sjc.xx.fbcdn.net/hphotos-ash3/24746_115782355108725_366462_n.jpg?lvh=1

When you stay with us at Grand Canyon Bed and Breakfast in Williams, AZ, one of your day trips can take you East a few miles to the Farm – it’s a great time for animal lovers of all ages.

Hogan Hozoni suite at the Grand Canyon Bed and Breakfast

One of our Family Suites

Hummingbirds to the Kiabab

June 30th, 2014 by Del & Sheryl Terry

Hummingbirds – Five Summer Visitors to the Kaibab

Rufous Often described as “feisty,” the Rufous may have the ideal size-to-weight ratio among North American hummingbirds. This bird out flies all other species, and usually gets its way at feeders at the expense of slower, less-maneuverable hummers. The Rufous has the longest migration route of all US hummingbirds.  It is common in Summer.Rufus hummingbird visiting the Grand Canyon Bed and Breakfast in Northern Arizona

Black-chinned Hummingbirds are very common in the western United States, breeding in West Texas and areas west and north up into Canada. Houston is at the eastern edge of their range and they are relatively common here in summer.. The male’s gorget is mostly black with a difficult-to-see band of violet-purple below.  Females’  plumage above is a more dull green and in a perched position, the wings appear longer with the outer primary feather broader with a blunt curved end.  Another clue to distinguish a Black-chin is that the it usually wags and pumps the tail when hovering. black-chinned hummingbird visiting the Grand Canyon Bed and Breakfast in Northern Arizona

 

Broad-tailed  The male Broad-tailed’s wings make a cricket-like whistle in flight. One female Broad-tailed holds the North American age record, at twelve years old.  A hummingbird of subalpine meadows, and a common visitor, the Broad-tailed Hummingbird ranges across the south-central Rockies in summer. It possesses a number of physiological and behavioral adaptations to survive cold nights, including the ability to enter torpor, slowing its heart rate and dropping its body temperature.Borad-tailed hummingbird visiting the Grand Canyon Bed and Breakfast in Northern Arizona

Calliope  The Calliope prefers high mountains, and has been seen as high as 11,000 feet.  It builds its nests over creeks or over roads next to streams or lakes, usually repairing the previous year’s nest or constructing a new one atop the old. This bird usually forages within five feet of the ground.  It is an occasional visitor in the courtyard and at the back fountain at Grand Canyon Bed and  Breakfast.Calliope hummingbird visiting the Grand Canyon Bed and Breakfast in Northern Arizona

Magnificent!  Occasionally visiting our B&B, and aptly named for its spectacular plumage, the Magnificent Hummingbird is one of several hummingbird species found in southeast Arizona but not regularly elsewhere in the United States. The species was known as Rivoli’s Hummingbird until the mid-1980s. The Magnificent Hummingbird is one of the two largest species. The black bill is long and straight to slightly curved. Both sexes look very dark unless the sun catches the iridescence of the plumage and the brilliant colors flash in the sunlight.

2014 Corvette Show

June 18th, 2014 by Del & Sheryl Terry

National Corvette Caravan: August 28-30, 2014

2014 is here!  Do you enjoy a great road trip and gathering of Corvette enthusiasts? If so join us for the 2014 Caravan to the National Corvette Museum for the 20th Anniversary of the National Corvette Museum in beautiful Bowling Green, Kentucky. This event is scheduled once every five years and is the Event of the Year for Corvette owners!

Maybe you are new to the Corvette world, or maybe you do not know of the 2014 Caravan, so what is the 2014 Caravan? It is a gathering of Corvette enthusiasts from around the United States, Canada and several other countries. We form caravans of Corvettes from locations around the Country to make a great road trip to Bowling Green, Kentucky. This will be an event beginning in late August which will celebrate the 20th Anniversary of the National Corvette Museum on Labor Day weekend of 2014. Caravans will form from locations close to your home for this event so you can participate with thousands of other Corvette owners. Participants can join at various locations along the way.  We will caravan along scenic sections of old Route 66. What could be better than travelling along the Mother Road in your Corvette?

On Route 66 we will join with the Southern California, Southern Nevada and Southwestern Utah Caravan at Williams, AZ., Friday – August 22: we will join the S. Cal/ S. Nevada/ SW Utah Caravan.  A Meet & Greet and a Show and Shine car show are planned along Route 66 in the last town to be bypassed on the ‘Mother Road’.

Come and stay with us at Grand Canyon Bed and Breakfast for this event.  You won’t get another chance for five years.

Caravan through Williams Arizona to Kentucky for the 20th Anniversary of the Corvette Museum

 

Red Rock Arches of Northern Arizona

June 2nd, 2014 by Del & Sheryl Terry

Adventures With Red Rock Arches -

You don’t have to travel to Arches National Park; experience Arizona’s Red Rock Arches within a 1.5 hour drive from Grand Canyon Bed and Breakfast.Arizona's Red Rock Arches in northern arizona near the Grand Canyon Bed and Breakfast

 

Most people come to Fay Canyon to see the natural arch that’s located just under a mile up the trail. But those who don’t know about it usually walk right past it. Though the Fay Canyon Arch is by no means small, it looks so much like an ordinary rock overhang it’s easy to glance right at it and not realize what you’ve seen. If you keep watching the rock wall to the north (right) side of the trail sooner or later you’ll spot it. Then the short, steep trail up to the arch can be a little hard to locate too.

After you’ve found the arch you may want to continue on up the trail. This small, hidden canyon supports a diverse community of desert plants and provides good views of the surrounding cliffs. The trail follows an old jeep track which eventually turns into a footpath. It dead ends at a red Supai sandstone cliff where you can see evidence of some ancient Indian dwellings and marvel at the breathtaking scenery that surrounds you.

   Area/Length : Red Supai sandstone cliff of northern Arizona near the Grand Canyon Bed and Breakfast

  1.1 miles

  Latitude :

34.901929

  Longitude :

-111.85791

  Elevation :

4592 at trailhead

 

Devil’s Bridge is the largest natural sandstone arch in the Sedona area; don’t let its name fool you: It’s one of the most heavenly sights in an area famous for them.

From a trailhead elevation of 4,600 feet, there’s a mere 400 foot climb in altitude during this moderately difficult, 1.8-mile roundtrip trek; the journey to reach the top won’t leave you breathless — but we would never say the same about the views you’ll witness when you finally get there.

This popular hike has attractions for both casual hikers who lack the desire or the stamina to stray too far from civilization, and the more adventurous outdoors enthusiasts. Starting at the parking area, follow the trailmarker that points the way to Devil’s Bridge Trail. You’ll find the early going effortless; the trail, originally built for jeep travel, is smooth and clear and leads you through washes filled with juniper and prickly pear cactus.

Area/Length :

  0.8 miles

  Latitude :

34.903223

  Longitude :

-111.81396

  Elevation :

4607 at trailhead

 

Take an easy hike along the bottom of Sterling Canyon. The drainage is dry most of the year. Shade is available, but it would be wise to carry some water in the warm months.Sterling Canyon in northern Arizona near the Grand Canyon Bed and Breakfast

The signed trailhead is on the east side of the parking area. The well maintained trail almost immediately enters Wilderness and climbs gradually in the shade of Arizona cypress beside a dry stream bed on the floor of Sterling Canyon. There are occasional views of red rock formations to the left and of the sheer walls of Lost Wilson Mountain on the right. After .75 miles, the trail enters stands of ponderosa pine and oak which show the scars from the 1996 “Arch” fire.  Nearing the 1.75 mile point, there is a marked fork. Sterling Pass Trail branches off to the right. Keep left and continue 100 yards where the trail ends at a large red rock outcrop. There are nice views of the canyon, mountains and of Vultee Arch, about .25 miles the north.

  Area/Length :

  1.75 miles

  Latitude :

34.937106

  Longitude :

-111.794187

  Elevation :

4803 at trailhead

Mule Rides at Canyon Vistas

May 30th, 2014 by Del & Sheryl Terry

View of Grand Canyon National Park at sunset from the South Rim

Canyon Vistas Mule Rides

Once you’ve taken in some of the history and admired the views of Grand Canyon like countless millions before you, it’s time to experience a unique viewing experience.Mule Rides on a trail in the Grand Canyon

Grand Canyon’s ‘long-eared taxis’, mules, depart twice daily (9am & 1 pm), through October, and once daily (10am) through mid-March. from Yaki Barn.

Your three hour adventure starts at the main livery barn in Grand Canyon Village. From there, riders will be transported aboard an interpretive tour bus to Yaki Barn near South Kaibab Trailhead. Here riders join their mules for two hours in the saddle on a four-mile ride that travels along a new trail built by the National Park Service. Wranglers will stop several times along the trail to provide interpretive information about geologic formations, human history, fire ecology, the Colorado River, the area’s native peoples, the surrounding forest and more. The cost of the ride is $114.00 plus tax.

Riders have been hosted by mules through Grand Canyon since 1887.  More than 600,000 tourists have taken advantage of riding rather than walking as they experience  the Park.  Now, for the first time in more than 125 years, you have the opportunity to take a mule a ride along the South Rim as well as down into Grand Canyon.mule rides trail through the Grand Canyon National Park

‘Canyon Vistas’ mule ride, which opened in August of 2013, will have you mere feet from the Canyon’s edge.  Mules (the offspring of a female horse and a male donkey) perfectly suited for the unnerving terrain because of their strength, temperament, and endurance.  It’s actually comforting to know that mules are stubborn.  These Jacks (male) and Jennies (female) don’t do anything that will put themselves in danger.  Mules are more sure-footed than horses, which is an additional bonus.    Because of the placement of their eyes, they can see all four of their hooves, which make it to safe for them to maneuver even the narrowest of trails.http://www.azcentral.com/i/f/9/f/M11_CIFR00d308a166c635a810895a89c5b0cf9f.jpg

Stay with us at Grand Canyon Bed and Breakfast, enjoy our acclaimed hospitality, and include the Canyon Vistas ride as part of your Grand Canyon experience.

Elden Pueblo at Coconino National Forest

May 26th, 2014 by Del & Sheryl Terry

Elden Pueblo at Coconino National Forest near Grand Canyon Bed and Breakfast

Elden Pueblo is the site of an ancient Sinagua (Sin ah’ wa) village,

inhabited from about A.D. 1070 to 1275. The site is unique for a variety of reasons. Most importantly, it makes archaeology and the study of ancient peoples accessible to the public. Since 1978, professional archaeologists have supervised members of the public in excavations, archaeological research techniques and artifact analysis through a variety of public and school programs.

Conveniently located on U.S. Highway 89 north, Elden Pueblo is thought to have been part of a major trading system. This is evidenced by discoveries of trade items, such as macaw skeletons from as far south as Mexico, to shell jewelry from the California Coast. Important discoveries recently uncovered at Elden Pueblo suggest that the Sunset Crater volcano may have erupted over a much longer period of time than previously thought.

The Arizona Natural History Association sponsors the Elden Pueblo Archaeology Project with the Coconino National Forest to provide opportunities for people to learn about and become involved in the science of archaeology. Annual programs include several Public Archaeology Days, in which the public can participate in site tours, actual excavation, artifact washing and analysis, and try their hand at using ancient hunting weapons. The August Public Day features a Primitive Technology Expo and the last Public Day of the year takes place in the fall as part of the annual Flagstaff Festival of Science.

Elden Pueblo is available for school programs and groups of up to thirty people. Educational programs are correlated to the Arizona State Standards, grades 4-7 in Social Science and Science. Custom programs are available, from 1-2 hours tours, to day-long excavations, or multiple-day programs. Elden Pueblo hosts the Arizona Archaeology Society’s summer field school, where avocational archaeologists receive training in various archaeological skills, such as excavation, stabilization, mapping, and laboratory techniques. There are also summer archaeology camps for students, from third grade and up.Archaeology camps at Elden Pueblo in Coconino National Forest near Grand Canyon Bed and Breakfast

Season: The site is open year-‘round for visitation. Brochures for self-guided tours are available on-site. Public programs, school programs, field schools and camps are conducted from Mid-April through October by appointment. Contact the Elden Pueblo Program Manager at (928) 527-3452 to schedule a program.

Facilities: Parking lot. Chemical toilets during the summer field season. An undeveloped camping area with potable water is available for special program participants during the summer.

Dating to the period between AD 1100 -1275 (about 800 years ago), Elden Pueblo is a 60-70 room Sinagua pueblo containing mounds, smaller pueblos, pit houses, and other features. It is located one half mile west of Mt. Elden in Flagstaff, AZ. The modern day Hopi consider the site a special ancestral place called PASIOVI or PAVASIOKI.

Elden Pueblo was first studied in 1926 by archaeologist Jesse Walter Fewkes. Later, the US Forest Service began to study the site and in the process developed a public archaeology education program focused on the following three topics: 1) teaching the public about the lives of the Sinagua people at Elden, 2) field methods in archaeology, and 3) to facilitate on-going research and protection at Elden Pueblo.

Out Of Africa Wildlife Park

May 19th, 2014 by Del & Sheryl Terry

Out of Africa; A Day Trip from Grand Canyon Bed and Breakfast

Tigers – You’ve never seen anything like this before! Witness one or more Bengal and Siberian tigers interact in a predator-and-play relationship, romping and splashing in a large pool as they play with their caretakers and various colorful toys at Out of Africa Wildlife Park

.Tigers performing at Out of Africa Wildlife Park near Grand Canyon Bed and Breakfast

Predator Feed – Follow our animal caretakers on the Predator Feed as they throw 800 pounds of raw food to eagerly waiting carnivores. Plenty of opportunities to take amazing pictures while bears chow down, hyenas laugh, and lions roar.Lions at Out of Africa Wildlife Park near Grand Canyon Bed and Breakfast

Wonders of Wildlife Show – You’ll be fascinated by the antics of our residents, whether it’s grizzly bears at play flopping in the pool, spotted hyenas playing tug-of-war with caretakers, or a walkabout where you’re shown a rare side of exotic animals.Swimming bears at Out of Africa Wildlife Park near Grand Canyon Bed and Breakfast

Creature Feature  - Experience an interactive animal encounter that will introduce you to some of our beloved and popular animal stars ranging from furry, to feathered, to scaly.Children hold constrictor snake at Out of Africa Wildlife Park near Grand Canyon Bed and BreakfastBaby meeting deer at Out of Africa Wildlife Park near Grand Canyon Bed and Breakfast

 

Giant Snake Show – Get behind the myths, and discover the reality of the Giant Snake. Take advantage of this interactive experience and opportunity to look closely. If you choose to, you can even touch and hold some of the world’s largest species. Safe for all ages.

Lounging lions at Out of Africa Wildlife Park near Grand Canyon Bed and Breakfast

Wildlife Preserve – Engage the splendor of the wildlife preserve, composed of the free-roaming Serengeti, the entertainment arena and courts, and spacious habitats located throughout the park. Enjoy by foot or park vehicles.

Some of the animals that live at Out of Africa Wildlife Park are considered to be threatened species. Additionally, we have animals that are considered to be near threatened, which means that they are in danger of being placed in the category of threatened in the future. Out of Africa Wildlife Park works in partnership with our global community to help conserve these animals for our planet. As a friend of Out of Africa Wildlife Park, there are many ways that you can get involved in this effort.

Antelope Slot Canyons

May 13th, 2014 by Del & Sheryl Terry

The Antelope Slot Canyons have been the area’s best kept secrets for generations.  

A photographers dream, as beautiful as some of them are, don’t do Upper and Lower Antelope Canyons justice.  On entering either one, visitors often gasp in wonder.  It’s a must see day trip for photographers of all levels, and greatly recommended for everybody else.

 Upper Antelope Slot Canyon Coconino National Forest Grand Canyon Bed and Breakfast VacationsUpper Antelope Slot Canyon Coconino National Forest Grand Canyon Bed and Breakfast VacationsLower Antelope Slot Canyon Coconino National Forest Grand Canyon Bed and Breakfast VacationsLower Antelope Slot Canyon Coconino National Forest Grand Canyon Bed and Breakfast Vacations

Upper Antelope Slot Canyon                                                          Lower Antelope Slot Canyon

When you take a guided van/boat tour arranged by Grand Canyon Bed and Breakfast, you travel through the beautiful painted desert of Northeastern Arizona arriving at Lake Powell and Antelope Point Marina.  Once arriving, your boat captain will take you deep into the depths of Antelope Canyon  Antelope Slot Canyon Coconino National Forest Grand Canyon Bed and Breakfast Vacations through towering red sandstone walls close enough to touch from either side of the vessel.  During the Summer months you will visit Antelope Island to enjoy your private beach where swimming is allowed.  After your boat trip you will have a deli style lunch before continuing into Upper Antelope Canyon by land.  This is the part of the tour that has become famous with rays of light beaming through the naturally caved out sandstone canyon.  You’ll return to the B&B on your van.

 

Should you decide to drive yourself for a day at Antelope Canyons, you can visit either or both Upper and Lower.  Both Canyons are on Navajo Tribal Land and require a Native guide to take you into them.  You pay for your guide and admission at a booth before you are taken into either of them.

Upper Antelope in entered through a jagged  opening in the wall of a box canyon (see picture on the left in the collage above).  This canyon is the most often photographed of the two because it is the easiest one to carry a camera and tripod into.  The floor of the canyon is fairly level and has a soft sandy base.  When you get to the South end of the canyon, you turn around and walk back out the same opening that you entered.

Lower Antelope is beautiful in a ‘different’ way and requires a little more strenuous level of activity.  You enter thru a ‘slit’ in the sandstone and climb down many sets of ladders (the first of them is depicted in the picture on the right of the collage above) and over sandstone floors as you descend into the earth.

Lower Antelope Slot Canyon Coconino National Forest Grand Canyon Bed and Breakfast VacationsLower Antelope Slot Canyon Coconino National Forest Grand Canyon Bed and Breakfast Vacations

It takes a little more time to visit this canyon.  When you get to the end of this guided tour, you ascend on metal stairs and the see top of the canyon zigzagging across the sandstone on your right.

Rodeo Reunion in Williams

May 6th, 2014 by Del & Sheryl Terry

Stay with us @ Grand Canyon Bed and Breakfast & enjoy the 2014 Cowpunchers Rodeo Reunion (real working cowboys & cowgirls) for four days – June 19th thru June 22nd

The rodeo grounds are located just south of downtown Williams, Arizona on Rodeo Rd. The first left off the first Williams exit will take you straight to his year’s events. The Grand Canyon Bed and Breakfast is located less than a mile from the rodeo grounds.

Hosted by the Cowpunchers Reunion Association; this is where the working cowboys and cowgirls of all ages get together to put on a rodeo reunion for themselves!  All events are unique and based on everyday activities and chores performed on horse and cattle ranches. An action packed event that is great fun to watch.

 

https://scontent-b-sjc.xx.fbcdn.net/hphotos-frc3/s720x720/426675_451982314822657_1918788724_n.jpg

 

And return for the 3 days of the 2014 Labor Day PRCA Rodeo – August 30th thru September 1st.  These athletes get paid to do this!

I:\Marketing\Images\Bull Ride.jpghttps://scontent-a-sjc.xx.fbcdn.net/hphotos-ash3/s720x720/541956_436861459668076_1444817862_n.jpg

Assembled in the 1970s, a group of working cowboys from across Arizona planned a rodeo event reminiscent of those they once participated in during the 1920s and 1940s. The first Reunion Rodeo took place in Flagstaff in 1978 and included mustang roping, big loop contest, and tie down team roping. The purpose behind the reunion was to celebrate the working cowboy with his family and fellow workers involved in the ranching  industry. Though elected board members rotate and slight rule changes have occurred over the years, the rodeo reunion has maintained its wild action and true working cowboy nature of fun and skill. Original reunions took place at Avery’s until its burning in late 1980 when it was moved to Williams then shuffled to Flagstaff before returning home.

Information for registration and events can be found in April’s newletter at  http://www.azcowpunchers.com/images/2014_April_Newsletter.pdf on the Cowpuncher’s website. Come and enjoy the heart pumping action and skill of those who live to rope and ride!

De Berge Saddlery & Western Outfitters

April 28th, 2014 by Del & Sheryl Terry

On your way down Route 40

 or towards the Grand Canyon, you have to slooooow down (15 mph) and go to De Berge’s Saddlery and Western Outfitters on Rte 66 in downtown Williams, AZ.  Martha’s husband (from the East coast) loved the belts and couldn’t make up his mind about the designs… she quietly ordered  one of the designs as a Christmas gift and within a short time the belt was in her hands!  Beautiful hats and belts as well as other products. You’ll see it’s worth the stop in the “slow movin’” town of Williams to visit and shop the workshop/store.

Belt making at the De Berge Saddlery and Western Outfitters in Williams Arizona close to the Grand Canyon Bed and Breakfast

If you are into real western wear and not the drugstore cowboy variety, this is the place to go. Anything leather, from saddles to gun holsters to belts and boots, are made here to order. The leather smith is Tamara, a charming young lady with a gifted hand for shaping and tooling leather. She makes her own designs and custom fits; generally a 90 day lead time. Tamara has a clientele made up mostly of locals cowboys & Europeans, but while Alfred , (from the West coast), was there a Navajo man came in to have a gun belt made for himself. Can’t get more real than that. Thick solid leather tends to have a macho look to it, but in Tamara’s hands embossed with floral designs it also becomes extremely elegant for the ladies. While much of her work is custom, there are enough ready-made things in the shop to make it worthwhile to stop in Williams at the De Berge Saddlery for instant gratification of your leather and western wear urges as you transit the state or move toward the Grand Canyon.

Float Through The Grand Canyon Colorado River

April 21st, 2014 by Del & Sheryl Terry

In Northern Arizona on the Colorado River,

it is a awe inspiring adventure – a 1 day river trip in one the most famous canyons in the world.  Available May through September this Grand Canyon Colorado River trip is relaxing as you’re moving through the gorge and hiking up side canyons, and being disconnected from the civilized world.

As one of your ‘day trips’,

Stay at Grand Canyon Bed and Breakfast and let us make your reservations for a 1 dayGrand Canyon Bed and Breakfast near the Colorado River

fifteen mile smooth water float trip which includes a shopping trip to Historic Cameron Trading Post on the Navajo Nation. Towering cliffs, pictographs, cool emerald green water, the smell of the Colorado River, and the call of a Great Blue Heron are just a few of many to arouse the senses on this nature experience.

 

We can make reservations for you with as little as two weeks advance notice BUT we suggest that you book your Colorado River experience as early as possible.  Just let us know the date you want to take your rafting trip when you reserve your room to stay with us and we’ll handle all arrangements.  The guided river trip runs March thru October each year.

Here is some information you need to know:

Rafting the calm waters of the Colorado River

Rafting the calm waters of the Colorado River

 

Personal Gear Packing List For River Runners

Waterproof shorts (light weight, fast drying material)

Lightweight pants & T-shirt

Towel

Tennis/athletic shoes or river-type sandals

Bandanna , hat with retention strap or visor

Lightweight jacket or fleece sweatshirt

Sunglasses with strap

Sun block

Camera/video camera*

*cameras should have straps. We are not responsible for damaged equipment.

Note: there is no place to recharge batteries. Also the

Grand Canyon River Rafting for 1 day

April 17th, 2014 by Del & Sheryl Terry

For Northern Arizona, it remains one of the greatest of all adventures – a 1 day river rafting trip in the most famous canyon in the world.  Grand Canyon Colorado River trips can become life-changing as moving thru the gorge and hiking up side canyons, and being disconnected from the civilized world is bound to alter a person forever.

Stay a few nights at Grand Canyon Bed and Breakfast and let us make your reservations for  a 1 day white water trip which includes a helicopter ride out of  the Canyon at the end of your river experience.  Whitewater and smooth water river rafting down the Colorado River in the Grand Canyon is worth it. Grand Canyon Bed and Breakfast makes reservations for Colorado River rafting trips

 

We can make reservations for you with as little as two weeks advance notice BUT we suggest that you book your Colorado River experience as early as possible.  Just let us know the date you want to take your rafting trip when you reserve your room to stay with us and we’ll handle all arrangements.  The guided river trip runs March thru October each year.

Here is some linformation you need to know:

 

All River Runner Guides are 100% certified. Guides give informative narrations on cultural history and make every trip unforgettable.  Motorized rafts are designed specifically for traversing the Colorado River.

Personal Gear Packing List For All River Runners

Waterproof shorts (light weight, fast drying material) and T-shirt

Lightweight pants

Towel

Tennis/athletic shoes or river-type sandals

Bandanna , hat with retention strap or visor

Lightweight jacket or fleece sweatshirt

Rain Jacket/Poncho for use through rapids

Sunglasses with strap & sun block

Small bag for belongings

Camera/video camera*WhiteWaterRafting RiverRafting

*cameras should have straps. We suggest that you store your camera in a zip-lock bag even when it is in the dry storage container. We are not responsible for damaged equipment.

Note: there is no place to recharge batteries. Many video cameras will not fit in the dry storage container we provide for you so we suggest bringing a waterproof bag. Also there is no

cell phone service during the trip or once you leave Interstate 40.

 

Forgot to tell you that a helicopter flies you up to the Rim when you get off the River.  You’ll then board a bus for your return trip to our B&B.

Hualapai Tourism – White ‘ll board a buss

AHOG (AZ Harley Owners Group) Returns to Williams

April 11th, 2014 by Del & Sheryl Terry

Once again about 500-600 HOG (Harley Owners Group) members are expected to take to the streets of Williams, AZ this summer

when the Arizona Harley Owners Group (AHOG) rally returns to town.  The rally will take place from June 5 to 7, 2014. 

AHOG is a statewide organization comprised of all of the chapters throughout Arizona.  They meet yearly to have fun, compete in riding events and elect state leaders for the following year.

Registration for the event will take place in the Visitor Center parking lot near the Babbitt-Polson Warehouse Stage just West of the intersection of Railroad Avenue and Grand Canyon Boulevard starting Thursday morning the 5th about 8am.  The rally group’s bike games will take place at the Rodeo Grounds.

 Williams is a friendly town where HOG owners can have a lot of fun.  It’s easy to walk around town, have great rides, and is close to the Grand Canyon, Jerome, and Kingman.

Williams is a great rally venue where HOG owners and their partners can enjoy a great time while spending 2 or 3 nights at Grand Canyon Bed & Breakfast, located in a quiet neighborhood less than a mile from the festivities and with off-street parking.This year’s rally will include bike games, guided motorcycle rides, a motorcycle show, a parade through town, dances and concerts.

Grand Canyon Harley-Davidson in Bellemont, AZ sponsors the Grand Canyon HOG Chapter, which will put on this year’s rally.If you don’t own a Harley (or any other brand of motorcycle) you can rent one for the event at Grand Canyon Harley-Davidson and ride into Williams in ‘style’.  There are other dealers throughout Arizona if you’d like to rent a bike and ride from you home to the AHOG.  You just possibly might fall in love with the machine and experience and buy one of your own.

The public is welcome to attend any of the events during the rally.

 

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