Archive for the ‘Grand Canyon in Spring’ Category

Watchtower, Desert View

March 5th, 2015 by Del & Sheryl Terry

Desert View Watchtower,

is one of the most prominent architectural features on the South Rim of Grand Canyon National Park. The watchtower is located at the Easternmost view point once you enter the Park on Hwy 64 coming from the Navajo community of Cameron on Hwy 89. From a distance, the building’s silhouette looks like the Anasazi watchtower of which it was meant to imitate.

File:Yavapai Observation Station.jpgDesert View Watchtower, Grand Canyon

The watchtower was designed by the renowned early 20th century architect Mary Elizabeth Jane Colter in collaboration with some of the renowned Hopi artisans of the day.  The original steel and concrete structure of the observation level is hidden from sight behind plaster, stone and wood. Murals by well-known Hope artist Fred Kabotie are featured prominently on the second level of the circular stairwell. The main space is the Kiva Room in the base structure, apparently roofed with logs that were salvaged from the old Grandview Hotel. The Watchtower is part of the Desert View Watchtower Historic District, which includes a number of support structures built and used by the Fred Harvey Company. Later used by the National Park Service, the Desert View Watchtower was designated a United States National Historic Landmark in May 28, 1987 as a collective nomination.

Desert View Watchtower, Grand Canyon National Park http://worldonabike.com/files/2009/04/20090228img-2755grand-canyon-1.jpg  From the top floor of the tower, you may see the varied colors of the Painted Desert and the Navajo Nation (the largest Native American reservation in the US) to the East, and the confluence of the Little Colorado River and the Colorado River to the North.  Access from balcony to balcony is provided by small accessible stairways and to the West you can see the majesty and beauty of the 13 mile wide Grand Canyon. The tower rises as an open shaft lined by circular balconies overlooking the central space whose engineering was provided by the Atchison, Topeka & Santa Fe Railway.

 

Arboretum, Coconino County

February 2nd, 2015 by Del & Sheryl Terry

The Arboretum, in Coconino County,

is a 200-acre arboretum that is home to 2,500 species of mostly drought-tolerant adapted and native plants representative of the high-desert Colorado Plateau, home to Grand Canyon and Zion National Park. It is located 3.8 miles (6.1 km) south of U.S. Route 66 on Woody Mountain Road, West of Flagstaff, Arizona. The facility is located at 7,150′ in elevation, making it one of the highest-elevation public gardens in the United States. The Arboretum is known for its extensive collection of the genus Penstemon.Coconino Count Arboretum

The Arboretum was originally forest and a working ranch, and the home of Frances McAllister in the late 1960s. In 1981 she began her long-held dream of creating an arboretum when she donated the land and created its financial endowment.

The Arboretum is a unique destination, specializing in plants native to the high elevation habitat of northern Arizona; open May through Coconino Count ArboretumOctober, six days a week (closed Tuesdays).

Many improvements are underway and they are making plans for an exciting 2014 season.Coconino Count Arboretum

The Colorado Plateau is home to 6,000 plant species, 34 of which are federally listed as threatened or endangered; many others are considered rare. This region is unique because federal agencies manage 55 percent of the land area.

The Arboretum has developed strong working relationships with local land managers and scientists to research, restore, and recover species found in this unique environment.

The Arboretum is a charter member of the Center for Plant Conservation and currently cares for 30 national collection plant species. The Research Department seeks to conserve these species using ex-situ (off-site) propagation, seed storage, and monitoring methods.

All of these efforts require help from a strong core of volunteers, without which they would fail to meet their conservation goals.Coconino Count Arboretum

To restore regional native landscapes, they need local seeds and the knowledge to grow them. The Research Department participates in the Seeds of Success Program sponsored by the Bureau of Land Management and plays a leading role in the Northern Arizona Native Seed Alliance (NANSA).

Located on The Arboretum grounds, Merriam-Powell Research Station enables land managers and scientists from far and wide an affordable means to come examine the unique flora and fauna of the Colorado Plateau.

Grand Canyon River Rafting for 1 day

April 17th, 2014 by Del & Sheryl Terry

For Northern Arizona, it remains one of the greatest of all adventures – a 1 day river rafting trip in the most famous canyon in the world.  Grand Canyon Colorado River trips can become life-changing as moving thru the gorge and hiking up side canyons, and being disconnected from the civilized world is bound to alter a person forever.

Stay a few nights at Grand Canyon Bed and Breakfast and let us make your reservations for  a 1 day white water trip which includes a helicopter ride out of  the Canyon at the end of your river experience.  Whitewater and smooth water river rafting down the Colorado River in the Grand Canyon is worth it. Grand Canyon Bed and Breakfast makes reservations for Colorado River rafting trips

 

We can make reservations for you with as little as two weeks advance notice BUT we suggest that you book your Colorado River experience as early as possible.  Just let us know the date you want to take your rafting trip when you reserve your room to stay with us and we’ll handle all arrangements.  The guided river trip runs March thru October each year.

Here is some linformation you need to know:

 

All River Runner Guides are 100% certified. Guides give informative narrations on cultural history and make every trip unforgettable.  Motorized rafts are designed specifically for traversing the Colorado River.

Personal Gear Packing List For All River Runners

Waterproof shorts (light weight, fast drying material) and T-shirt

Lightweight pants

Towel

Tennis/athletic shoes or river-type sandals

Bandanna , hat with retention strap or visor

Lightweight jacket or fleece sweatshirt

Rain Jacket/Poncho for use through rapids

Sunglasses with strap & sun block

Small bag for belongings

Camera/video camera*WhiteWaterRafting RiverRafting

*cameras should have straps. We suggest that you store your camera in a zip-lock bag even when it is in the dry storage container. We are not responsible for damaged equipment.

Note: there is no place to recharge batteries. Many video cameras will not fit in the dry storage container we provide for you so we suggest bringing a waterproof bag. Also there is no

cell phone service during the trip or once you leave Interstate 40.

 

Forgot to tell you that a helicopter flies you up to the Rim when you get off the River.  You’ll then board a bus for your return trip to our B&B.

Hualapai Tourism – White ‘ll board a buss

Special Event Permits

March 28th, 2014 by Del & Sheryl Terry

Special Event Permits in Coconino National Forest

 

Coconino National Forest in Northern Arizona offers many spectacular views and trails that have been amazing visitors for many lifetimes. These breathtaking views have been popular backdrops for weddings of all sizes. Brides have found the perfect setting for small and simply weddings as well as larger, catered venues. Popular destinations, such as Crescent Moon Ranch, require special event permits and agreement to abide by all rules for National Park use.http://www.publicdomainpictures.net/view-image.php?image=1143&picture=rings

 

Several planning companies offer their services for weddings in Coconino National Forest and can help with as little or as much as any bride could wish for their outdoor wedding. Special Events Permits within the forest are required for all groups of 75 people or more as well as all events requiring admission. Smaller wedding parties need also be aware of all park regulations when planning their day.


Crescent Moon Ranch popular for weddings in Coconino National Forest with special event permits

 

Wedding Guests wishing to be married at the Crescent Moon Ranch at the base of Cathedral Park must read and abide by the special requirements of the park, implemented because of the popularity of the site for the use of weddings. These regulations and Special Event Permits are found at http://www.fs.usda.gov/Internet/FSE_DOCUMENTS/stelprdb5289868.pdf.

 

For other wedding destinations couples can consider locations such as West Clear Creek, Kendrick Mountain, Fossil Creek, Wet Beaver, and Kachina Peaks; for all of which pictures are available in our Gallery . For permits and regulations regarding National Park use for weddings bridal parties can visit the National Forest website at http://www.fs.usda.gov/detail/coconino/passes-permits/event-commercial/?cid=stelprdb5328575.

For couples wishing to be married inside the Grand Canyon, park rules and permits are different from those in other destinations of the National Forest. Fore information on obtaining a licence for a park wedding you may visit the Grand Canyon park management page at http://www.nps.gov/grca/parkmgmt/sup.htm. There you will find links to all the available pages for wedding parties, applications, associated fees, and the required permits for area use. Please be advised that the scenes of the Grand Canyon, as well as Crescent Moon Ranch, are highly desirable settings for wedding events and may require advanced planning and reservations.

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