Archive for the ‘Grand Canyon Attractions’ Category

Grand Canyon Caverns

July 21st, 2014 by Del & Sheryl Terry

Grand Canyon Caverns located on the Coconino Plateau,

the Caverns lie within an alluvial plain at an altitude of about 5,300 feet (1,600 m) above sea level. Limestone comprises the vast majority of the subsurface area of this vicinity of the Coconino Plateau, an area riddled with numerous cavernous veins that run for miles in all directions.Grand Canyon Taverns off Rte 66; http://www.gokingman.com/media/uploads/images/Grand-Canyon-Caverns-300px-.jpg

Just 66 miles West of Williams ,AZ on Route 66, the Caverns lie 230 feet (70 m) below ground level. They are among the largest of dry caverns in the United States. Dry caverns are a rarity in that as little as 3% of caverns in the world are dry. Because of this fact, stalagmites and stalactites are very few in numbers. The caverns are enormous, with measurements showing that the length of 3 football fields could fit snugly within its boundaries.

345 million years ago, during the Mississippian Period, the southwest United States was enveloped by the ocean. Sea creatures died over the millions of years, their skeletons created a mud-like paste with a dense amount of lime. This eventually hardened into the limestone bedrock, which can be seen in the caverns today. As millions of years came and went, the bedrock was pushed up, to over 5,000 feet (1,500 m) above sea level. These methodical events split the crust of the Earth, releasing water into what is now the caverns.Grand Canyon Caverns off Rte 66; http://t2.gstatic.com/images?q=tbn:ANd9GcTAL3tZ_H5Rdf1vmTBPXH6FukaB8j-RqUEhB3YAXtqHxuo4VN8i

Approximately 35 million years ago, huge amounts of rainfall carrying a mildly acidic element flowed into the caverns. This solution eventually crept its way through the cracks and caves ultimately contributing to the Colorado River. Millions of years later the evaporating water leaving calcium deposits began decorating the walls and floors, creating wondrous and beautiful formations that can still be viewed by the public today.

Contemporary History

In 1927, Walter Peck, a cowboy and woodcutter, was walking through the area on his way to play poker with his friends. when he stumbled and nearly fell into a sizable hole in the ground. The following morning, Peck, and some of his friends returned to the location of the large, funnel shaped hole with lanterns and ropes. Peck was lowered into the hole by his friends with a rope tied around his waist to a depth of 150 feet (46 m) with a lantern and began exploring.

A very large, dark cavern welcomed Peck during his initial exploration where he saw some speckles on the walls that he thought were gold. He gathered up samples of some of these shiny rocks and had his friends pull him back to the surface. Peck then purchased the property and began making preparations for a gold mining operation. Once the assay reports were completed he learned that his potential mother lode was nothing more than iron oxide.Grand Canyon Caverns off Rte 66; http://t3.gstatic.com/images?q=tbn:ANd9GcRhGLetIT1O3rTpq_DQTRL3YwJvkCnZtdYG7nGAlXXm2PBhfp8-nQ

Not one to give up on entrepreneurial opportunities, Peck came up with an idea to lure travelers to the Caverns and began charging 25 cents to lower these early spelunkers down into the Caverns to explore and to view what had been reported in newspapers to be the remains of a caveman that had earlier been located on a ledge. Although the ‘caveman’ had also lured scientist from the east to study the remains, it was later confirmed in the 1960s to be the remains of two inhabitants of the area. These inhabitants had been in the area barely a decade earlier during the winter of 1917-1918, when a group of Indians were harvesting and cutting firewood on the caverns hilltop and a snow storm trapped them for three days. Two brothers died from a flu epidemic and since the ground was frozen solid with deep snow cover, their fellow lumberjacks buried them in what they thought was only a 50-foot (15 m) hole because returning them to their tribal headquarters in Peach Springs, risked spreading the flu.

An entrance was built into the Caverns by blasting a 210-foot (64 m) shaft in the limestone and installing a large elevator at which time the natural entrance was also sealed off at the request of the Hualapai as it was considered a sacred burial place. Near the natural entrance, the skeletal remains of a giant and extinct ground sloth were found; it lived during the Age of Mammals when the Woolly Mammoth and Saber Tooth Cat lived more than 11,000 years ago. The study of the remains indicate it stood over 15 feet (4.6 m) tall and weighed near 2,000 pounds.Grand Canyon Caverns off Rte 66; http://www.utchs.com/Grand_Canyon_Caverns/IMG_0342.jpg

In 1962, the Caverns were renamed, Grand Canyon Caverns, with good reason, as it is connected to the Grand Canyon to the north.  They are an  Historic Route 66 roadside tourist attraction that has survived into the current century with nearly 100,000 tourists annually.

Features

Grand Canyon Caverns is the largest dry caverns in the United States and maybe the largest dry cavern system on earth as they are still being explored and documented by both amateur and professional spelunkers, archaeologists, geologists and other varieties of scientists. At a constant 57 degrees with only a 2 percent humidity year round the Caverns are an ideal preservatory.  Air comes into the caverns from the Grand Canyon through 60 miles (97 km) of limestone caves. (See picture of opening at end of article). Scientists were curious as to how far the caverns extended and looked for a safe means of finding out. Rather than explore the canyons, which could take years, red smoke flares were ignited by University of Arizona students, and two weeks later red smoke was seen protruding from vents, near Supai, AZ, in the Grand Canyon, thus the name.  Supai Falls near Grand Canyon Caverns; http://photos2.demandstudios.com/dm-resize/photos.demandstudios.com%2Fgetty%2Farticle%2F88%2F114%2F87672387_XS.jpg?w=400&h=10000&keep_ratio=1

Spelunkers and tourists alike can take a 45-minute, guided, walking tour of the Caverns beginning with a 21-story, or 210-foot (64 m) descent from the earth’s surface in a large elevator, or a shorter 25-minute wheelchair accessible tour. The more hardcore and professional spelunkers can explore on their own, with the proper permission of course, areas that are never seen by the ordinary tours.

The first cavern that one enters after their descent by elevator is the Chapel of the Ages cavern room which is so large it could hold up to two football fields. There have been numerous weddings performed in this room throughout the years. The most popular guided walking tour is about 3/4 of a mile long through winding, natural tunnels where guests will see helecite crystals, a rather rare form of selenite, red-wall limestone, ‘teacup handles’, ‘winter crystals’ and more.  The Caverns are a popular natural feature of this vast recreational area in Northern Arizona.

Grand Canyon Deer Farm

July 8th, 2014 by Del & Sheryl Terry

Grand Canyon Deer Farm near Williams, Arizona

Have you ever wanted to pet a deer?  Can you imagine your picture taken with a deer close enough to hug?

Grand Canyon Deer Farm https://fbcdn-sphotos-e-a.akamaihd.net/hphotos-ak-ash2/s720x720/530004_405565136130444_1396360490_n.jpg When you visit Grand Canyon Deer Farm, you walk with a herd of Fallow Deer that are tame enough to eat out of your hand and that love to be petted.

Grand Canyon Deer Farm https://scontent-b-sjc.xx.fbcdn.net/hphotos-frc3/s720x720/306055_258251244195168_2079440_n.jpg

The Fallow Deer are living among wallabies, marmoset, coatimundis, zebu, & mini-horses & donkeys.  There is also a cockatoo & parrot.

You’ll also get up close and personal with a reindeer or two.

Grand Canyon Deer Farm https://scontent-b-sjc.xx.fbcdn.net/hphotos-ash3/24746_115782355108725_366462_n.jpg?lvh=1

When you stay with us at Grand Canyon Bed and Breakfast in Williams, AZ, one of your day trips can take you East a few miles to the Farm – it’s a great time for animal lovers of all ages.

Hogan Hozoni suite at the Grand Canyon Bed and Breakfast

One of our Family Suites

Rodeo Reunion in Williams

May 6th, 2014 by Del & Sheryl Terry

Stay with us @ Grand Canyon Bed and Breakfast & enjoy the 2014 Cowpunchers Rodeo Reunion (real working cowboys & cowgirls) for four days – June 19th thru June 22nd

The rodeo grounds are located just south of downtown Williams, Arizona on Rodeo Rd. The first left off the first Williams exit will take you straight to his year’s events. The Grand Canyon Bed and Breakfast is located less than a mile from the rodeo grounds.

Hosted by the Cowpunchers Reunion Association; this is where the working cowboys and cowgirls of all ages get together to put on a rodeo reunion for themselves!  All events are unique and based on everyday activities and chores performed on horse and cattle ranches. An action packed event that is great fun to watch.

 

https://scontent-b-sjc.xx.fbcdn.net/hphotos-frc3/s720x720/426675_451982314822657_1918788724_n.jpg

 

And return for the 3 days of the 2014 Labor Day PRCA Rodeo – August 30th thru September 1st.  These athletes get paid to do this!

I:\Marketing\Images\Bull Ride.jpghttps://scontent-a-sjc.xx.fbcdn.net/hphotos-ash3/s720x720/541956_436861459668076_1444817862_n.jpg

Assembled in the 1970s, a group of working cowboys from across Arizona planned a rodeo event reminiscent of those they once participated in during the 1920s and 1940s. The first Reunion Rodeo took place in Flagstaff in 1978 and included mustang roping, big loop contest, and tie down team roping. The purpose behind the reunion was to celebrate the working cowboy with his family and fellow workers involved in the ranching  industry. Though elected board members rotate and slight rule changes have occurred over the years, the rodeo reunion has maintained its wild action and true working cowboy nature of fun and skill. Original reunions took place at Avery’s until its burning in late 1980 when it was moved to Williams then shuffled to Flagstaff before returning home.

Information for registration and events can be found in April’s newletter at  http://www.azcowpunchers.com/images/2014_April_Newsletter.pdf on the Cowpuncher’s website. Come and enjoy the heart pumping action and skill of those who live to rope and ride!

Special Event Permits

March 28th, 2014 by Del & Sheryl Terry

Special Event Permits in Coconino National Forest

 

Coconino National Forest in Northern Arizona offers many spectacular views and trails that have been amazing visitors for many lifetimes. These breathtaking views have been popular backdrops for weddings of all sizes. Brides have found the perfect setting for small and simply weddings as well as larger, catered venues. Popular destinations, such as Crescent Moon Ranch, require special event permits and agreement to abide by all rules for National Park use.http://www.publicdomainpictures.net/view-image.php?image=1143&picture=rings

 

Several planning companies offer their services for weddings in Coconino National Forest and can help with as little or as much as any bride could wish for their outdoor wedding. Special Events Permits within the forest are required for all groups of 75 people or more as well as all events requiring admission. Smaller wedding parties need also be aware of all park regulations when planning their day.


Crescent Moon Ranch popular for weddings in Coconino National Forest with special event permits

 

Wedding Guests wishing to be married at the Crescent Moon Ranch at the base of Cathedral Park must read and abide by the special requirements of the park, implemented because of the popularity of the site for the use of weddings. These regulations and Special Event Permits are found at http://www.fs.usda.gov/Internet/FSE_DOCUMENTS/stelprdb5289868.pdf.

 

For other wedding destinations couples can consider locations such as West Clear Creek, Kendrick Mountain, Fossil Creek, Wet Beaver, and Kachina Peaks; for all of which pictures are available in our Gallery . For permits and regulations regarding National Park use for weddings bridal parties can visit the National Forest website at http://www.fs.usda.gov/detail/coconino/passes-permits/event-commercial/?cid=stelprdb5328575.

For couples wishing to be married inside the Grand Canyon, park rules and permits are different from those in other destinations of the National Forest. Fore information on obtaining a licence for a park wedding you may visit the Grand Canyon park management page at http://www.nps.gov/grca/parkmgmt/sup.htm. There you will find links to all the available pages for wedding parties, applications, associated fees, and the required permits for area use. Please be advised that the scenes of the Grand Canyon, as well as Crescent Moon Ranch, are highly desirable settings for wedding events and may require advanced planning and reservations.

What to do in Northern Arizona

February 12th, 2014 by Del & Sheryl Terry

What To Do and See in Northern Arizona While Staying At Grand Canyon Bed and Breakfast

northern arizona williams gateway to the grand canyon

           Attractions within 1 mile of Grand Canyon Bed and Breakfast (in the City Limits) in Northern Arizona:

  • Historic Walking Tour of Williams, AZ

  • “Cruise the Loop” in Williams, AZ

  • Shops

  • Restaurants

  • Grand Canyon Railroad

  • Bearizona Wildlife Park

Enjoy attractions within a 30 mile radius:

West of our Bed & Breakfast

           South of B&B

  • Elk Ridge Ski Resort

  • Kaibab National Forest – for hiking, mountain biking, downhill and cross-country skiing

  • Coleman Lake Wildlife Refuge

  • Dogtown Reservoir

  • Bill Williams Mountain

  • White Horse Lake

  • Schultz Lake Wildlife Refuge

Attractions within a 60 mile radius:

North of our Bed & Breakfast

West of our Bed & Breakfast

  • Grand Canyon Caverns

East of our Bed & Breakfast

  • Indian Ruins: Wupatki, Walnut Canyon, Montezuma Well, Montezuma Castle, Tuzigoot, and Palatki National Monuments

  • San Francisco Peaks and Arizona Snowbowl

  • Hart Prairie

  • Sunset Crater National Monument

  • Lowell Observatory

  • Northern Arizona Museum

  • Theatre, Symphony and Performing Arts

  • Antique Stores, Shops, Restaurants and Night life

Attractions within a 90 mile radius:

East of our Bed & Breakfast

 South of our Bed & Breakfast

  • Scenic Route 89A through Oak Creek Canyon

  • Red Rocks of Sedona\

  • Sedona Shops

  • Galleries featuring Native American arts

  • Galleries featuring Southwestern arts

  • Outlet Mall

 East & North of our Bed & Breakfast

  • Navajo Indian Reservation

  • Hopi Indian Reservations

  • Trading Posts featuring Native American arts

There is enough in the mountains and high deserts around Grand Canyon Bed and Breakfast in Northern Arizona to keep you busy for quite a few days!

The Grand Canyon Railway Steam Engine

January 16th, 2014 by Del & Sheryl Terry

The Grand Canyon Railway Steams to the Canyon

Monday, February 17th is the 1st ‘Steam to the Canyon’ scheduled in 2014. Historic steam engine 4960 will pull passenger cars to and from the Grand Canyon. It isn’t often that this happens. Most days in the year, The train is pulled by a diesel engine.steam engine pulling grand canyon railway

The Grand Canyon Railway is fueled by waste vegetable oil (WVO), driven by an iron will, powered by ingenuity. The Grand Canyon Railway preserves our historic trains and the environment through which they run.

We celebrates the history of vintage rail travel with several steam-powered excursions to the Grand Canyon. You, too can ride all the way to the Canyon and back behind 90 year-old Locomotive 4960.

For years the Railway operated steam engines from Memorial Day to Labor Day, but in 2008 we discontinued regular runs because of environmental considerations. Operating an all-diesel fleet of locomotives year-round saves a considerable amount of fuel and reduces greenhouse gas emissions and air pollutants associated with steam locomotives.

The railway recently became the first tourist railway in the United States to receive ISO 14001 third-party certification of its environmental management system (EMS) after a two-year process involving complete review, development and implementation of environmental initiatives in all of its operations.

There are two operable steam locomotives that have been restored to like-new working condition. Locomotive No. 4960 was built in 1923 by Baldwin Locomotive Works in Philadelphia. It operated a freight and coal hauling service for the Midwestern Chicago, Burlington & Quincy (CB&Q) railroad until the late 1950s and made its first official run on the Grand Canyon line in 1996. Locomotive No. 29 was restored in 2004 at a cost of more than $1 million and 26,000 man-hours of labor. An SC-3 class locomotive, Locomotive No. 29 was built in 1906 by ALCO in Pittsburgh and weighs 185 tons. No. 29 currently enjoys semi-retirement as a prominent fixture on the platform in Williams.

For more information on the Railway and Its Steam Engine events please visit The Train.

Grand Canyon Air Tours

January 16th, 2014 by Del & Sheryl Terry

Grand Canyon Air Tours via Helicopter and Plane

Grand Canyon Air tour companies, within an hour’s drive of grand canyon air summer view offer helicopter or fix wing aerial tours of Grand Canyon, allowing passengers the opportunity to  soar like an eagle high above the clouds for periods from 1/2 hour to 2 1/2 hours.

 

Del and Sheri have experienced both the fixed wing and helicopter tours.  All fly routes that do not infringe on the peace and serenity of those people hiking on the Rim or into the Canyon on the main trails.

 

The side windows of the OTTER fifteen passenger fixed wing airplane are huge.  Because the wings are above the aircraft there is an unobstructed view on your side of the plane. The pilots (there are two of them in each plane) are experienced and have many hours of safe Grand Canyon flights to their credit.  The dialogue during your flight lets you know what you’re seeing as you fly at 1000 feet above the South Rim over the Canyon towards and over the North Rim.

 

The experience is different and the helicopters are more intimate because they carry fewer passengers.  They fly at an elevation of 500 feet above the South Rim.  If your photographic device has the capability, you can plug it into the sound system of the aircraft and the music and dialogue will accompany the film you record to remember your breath taking experience.

grand canyon air OTTER fixed wing plane tours grand canyon air helicopter tours grand canyon air helicopter tour

Four companies offer this service from Grand Canyon Airport located between Grand Canyon Bed and Breakfast and the South Rim:

 

Grand Canyon AirlinesGrand Canyon HelicoptersMaverick Helicopters - Papillon Grand Canyon Helicopters

 

You can choose which aircraft and length on tour is right for you and make your reservations online at any of the above URLs.

You can also make your reservation to stay at Grand Canyon Bed and Breakfast By clicking here.

Arizona Wedding

January 13th, 2014 by Del & Sheryl Terry

An Arizona wedding with the beauty and variety of the Wild West.

Many couples are searching for the most romantic and most memorable way to celebrate their union. Arizona offers some of the most breathtaking and unique views and backdrops for any wedding. Whether you are looking for an extreme vow exchange or more of a traditional ceremony, the southwestern landscape of an Arizona wedding offers everything from desert to mountain; heat wave to gently falling snow.

Couples can delight their guests with a trip on the most famous train of the west on their way to and from the Grand Canyon enjoying the comfort of private cars and even an observation car for those wishing to take their vows along the way. Sedona offers the beauty of its majestic red rocks facing the Oak Creek Canyon with banquet halls and golf courses for many budgets and tastes. For more quiet events the Aspen Groves of Williams can promise seclusion and serenity. Themed Arizona weddings abound along the streets of Historic Route 66 and within its many museums.

Join other brides in Flagstaff on Saturday,January 25, 2014, at the Northern Arizona Wedding Expo where a ’One Stop Shop’ for brides, attracts brides from all over looking for an easy solution for planning their Arizona wedding. More information can be found at http://www.flagstaffwoodlandshotel.com/weddingexpo/.

For an Arizona Marriage License

  • Both parties must appear together in person at the Clerk of the Court office at Williams Justice Court

    Address:
    700 W. Railroad Ave.
    Williams, AZ 86046

    Ph: (928) 679-7698  ,

    Hours:
    8:00 AM – 5:00 PM
    Monday – Friday

  • Fees are $76 cash

  • Provide drivers license to verify names

  • Social Security numbers are required from U.S. citizens

  • Parties must be 18 years of age or older, or:

    • Parties 16-17 must have both parents consent

    • Parties under 16 require parents consent and a judges order

Tour the Grand Canyon by Boat or Whitewater Raft

January 7th, 2014 by Del & Sheryl Terry

For the Grand Canyon in Northern Arizona,

it remains the granddad of all adventures.

river trip through the most famous canyon in the world.  The 144,500 mile long Colorado River snakes its way through the canyon and flows all the way to Mexico. Grand Canyon Colorado River trips often become life-changing as moving through the gorge, running its rapids and being disconnected from the civilized world for as much as three weeks is bound to alter a person forever.White wter rafting in the Colorado River of the Grand Canyon Seated on a rock overlooking the Colorado River, it’s hard to imagine life getting much better than on a river trip, watching the sun come up over the Grand Canyon. Rafting the Canyon is a religious experience for many of the thousands of boaters who ply the waters.

Both motorized and non-motorized boat tours on the Colorado river are available. Motorized boat tours  offer riders a chance to walk around on the raft while floating. Non-motorized boat tours offer a chance to enjoy the canyon at the pace of the Colorado river. Riders may choose to raft down whitewater or smooth water sections of the river on either single or multiple-day trips

 

While it usually requires reservations and a long wait, whitewater rafting the Colorado River thru the Grand Canyon is worth it.  Most guests book a year or two or more in advance to get the dates they want.  Some people choose a taste of the river with a 3 day motor trip from Lee’s Ferry to Phantom Ranch.  You can also start your 3 day trip at Phantom Ranch and get off the River at Diamond Creek.  Other guests go for the longer trips that cover a good deal of the Canyon’s 277 river miles.

More than a dozen companies offer trips of various lengths and styles.

Suggested URL is: Plan Your Trip

 

Lifetime Admittance to ANY National Park/Monument

April 1st, 2011 by Del & Sheryl Terry

Enjoy Lifetime admittance to all of the Nations Parks and Monuments.

If you are a US Citizen, The National Park Service offers a special offer for when you’ve reached or passed the age of 62. A Golden Age Passport (lifetime admittance pas) can be purchased for $20 giving you free entry to any and all national parks and national monuments in the US.  If you are under 62, you can purchase a National Parks Pass for $50 which allows unlimited access for one calendar year.  There are other benefits to own either one of them.  More information about both passes can be obtained from the booklet you receive when you purchase your Pass.

Visit our web site and make a reservation to stay at Grand Canyon Bed and Breakfast.  Purchase a Golden Age Passport or National Parks Pass at the Williams/Grand Canyon Visitor Center.  Explore Grand Canyon, one of the seven natural wonders of the world.  We’ll make your visit to the Grand Canyon an enjoyable one.  We look forward to spending time together.

*2013 update*  This pass is no longer available, but has now been replaced by the America the Beautiful – National Parks and Federal Recreational Lands Pass.
Information for obtaining one of these passes is available at http://store.usgs.gov/pass/senior.html. This lifetime pass provides access to more than 2,000 recreation sites managed by five Federal agencies, with up to 100% of the proceeds being used to improve and enhance visitor recreation services. Those carrying Golden Age passes may be assured they are still good for the life of the bearer.

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